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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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101 through 109 of 109

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : How do ultrasound and mammography compare in breast cancer screening?

Most relevant for: Young women at high risk for breast cancer with limited access to mammography and MRI is not easily accessible

Mammography has been shown to reduce breast cancer deaths; however, women in developing countries don’t have easy access to mammography. Ultrasound screening, on the other hand, is portable and less expensive, and could be an alternative to mammography. This study compared mammography to ultrasound in women with dense breasts and found the two techniques have similar cancer detection rates, although the false positive rate is higher with ultrasound. (02/16/16)

 

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Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Human Research

Most relevant for: Breast cancer patients who have an inherited mutation and breast cancer patients who developed leukemia after treatment for breast cancer.

The population of breast cancer survivors in the United States is increasing. One rare but dangerous long-term effect of breast cancer treatment is an increased risk of leukemia, a type of bone marrow cancer. A recent study uncovered a potential genetic basis for this condition. (01/26/2015)

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Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Lab Research

Study : Do parabens in personal care products increase breast cancer risk?

Most relevant for: Women who use personal care products that contain parabens.

Parabens are chemicals that can mimic the hormone estrogen in the body. As estrogen has been shown to increase breast cancer risk, some people have asked if parabens found in some cosmetics and shampoos will also increase breast cancer risk. Many studies have shown that parabens in the quantities found in personal care products are safe. A recent study of human breast cancer cells suggests that in certain conditions, parabens could help some breast cancer cells grow. It is important to remember that this is early research; this single laboratory-based study does not conclusively prove that parabens are dangerous. More work, including human studies, needs to be done to understand if parabens increase cancer risk. (01/16/2016)

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Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Human Research

Study : How many children with cancer have mutations in genes that increase cancer risk?

Most relevant for: Survivors of childhood cancer and people with a family history of relatives diagnosed with childhood cancers

Many genes are associated with increased cancer risk in adults, but it is unclear how common these mutations are in children with cancer. This study found that about 9% of children with cancer carry mutations in a gene that is known to increase cancer risk. Over half of the mutations were in the TP53 gene, which is associated with increased cancer risk at a young age and increased risk of breast cancer in adults. (12/15/2015)

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Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Aerobic exercise lowers estrogen levels in premenopausal women at high risk for breast cancer

Most relevant for: High risk women with a BRCA mutation or a close relative with a BRCA mutation

Many treatments that lower estrogen levels also reduce breast cancer risk. Unfortunately, these treatments are also associated with negative side effects. A recent study looked at the effect of regular aerobic exercise on the estrogen levels of women who are at high risk for breast cancer. (11/14/2015)

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Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium-Low

Research Timeline: Human Research

Study : Breastfeeding may reduce hormone receptor negative breast cancer risk

Most relevant for: Women who are pregnant or have just given birth and are deciding about breastfeeding

Previous studies have shown that women who breastfeed have a reduced breast cancer risk. This study examines this association in the different breast cancer subtypes (ER, PR, HER2 negative/positive) and finds that breastfeeding is associated with a reduced risk of ER-/PR- breast cancer. (11/16/2015)

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Relevance: Low

Quality of Writing: Low

Article : What “The Truth About Cancer” got wrong about BRCA mutations and cancer

Most relevant for: Because this video is full of medical misinformation, it is not relevant for anyone making healthcare decisions

A website called thetruthaboutcancer.com, created a 9-part docu-series titled “The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest” (TACGQ). The video states that Angelina Jolie’s decision to remove her breasts was one made out of fear; one commentator states that her decision was “barbaric." This video contains a lot of dangerous misinformation about BRCA mutations and inherited cancer. FORCE XRAYS provides the following point-by-point analysis on "The Truth About Cancer." (11/10/2015)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

Study : Impact of familial breast cancer risk on young girls

Most relevant for: Young women and girls from high-risk breast cancer families

Does growing up in a family that is at high risk for breast cancer affect young girls? Recent research found girls from families with BRCA mutations and/or a strong family history of cancer to be as well adjusted as peers of the same age. The one difference was that girls from families facing breast cancer risk had more stress related to breast cancer than their peers. While these findings are reassuring, parents know their children best, and they should ask for help if they believe their daughters are not coping well. (11/03/2015)

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Relevance: Medium-Low

Strength of Science: Medium-Low

Study : Prenatal exposure to the pesticide DDT and breast cancer risk

Most relevant for: Women with prenatal exposure to DDT, women in countries where DDT is used

This study found an association between prenatal exposure to the pesticide DDT, and an increased risk of women developing breast cancer. While this study does not prove that DDT exposure directly causes breast cancer, it serves as a reminder that pregnant women's exposure to toxic environmental agents can affect their children's risk for disease later in life.

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