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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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1 through 10 of 25

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : New tool to predict breast cancer risk for Black women

Most relevant for: Black women in the U.S.

An important part of making decisions about breast cancer screening and prevention is knowing your breast cancer risk. Specific tools are used to identify people who would benefit from early and/or additional screening and chemoprevention or those who would most benefit from genetic counseling and testing. Because these tools were developed using data mostly from white women, they are unable to predict cancer risk as well for Black women. To begin to address these gaps, researchers developed a new tool specifically designed to predict breast cancer risk for Black women. This tool has been shown to work well, especially for younger Black women. (posted 3/22/2022)

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : The chance of a second breast cancer is higher among some Hawai'ian women

Most relevant for: women of Hawai’ian, Filipino or Asian American ancestry.

Women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), an early form of breast cancer, are more likely to have a second breast cancer diagnosis if they are of Native Hawai'ian, Filipino or Japanese ancestry than women of other racial or ethnic groups. (posted 3/15/22)

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Frequency of inherited mutations linked to breast cancer are similar in Black and white women

Most relevant for: Non-Hispanic Black and white women with breast cancer

The CARRIERS study looked at the rate of inherited mutations in women with and without breast cancer. In an extension of the CARRIERS study, researchers found no difference in the frequency of inherited mutations in breast cancer genes among Black and white women with breast cancer. A few individual genes differed in frequency: BRCA2 and PALB2 mutations were seen more often in Black women, while CHEK2 mutations were seen less often. Researchers concluded that race should not be used to determine who is referred for genetic testing. (posted 8/13/21)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: High

Update : Breast cancer disparities in Black Americans

Most relevant for: Black women in the US

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) released a 2020 report about cancer disparities among racial and ethnic groups in the United States. In this review, we highlight findings on the burden of breast cancer in Black women. (posted 8/5/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: High

Update : Cancer disparities: Colorectal cancer in African Americans

Most relevant for: African Americans concerned about colorectal cancer

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) released a 2020 report about cancer disparities among racial and ethnic groups in the United States. In this XRAY review, we highlight data from the report about the burden of colorectal cancer in African Americans, who have the highest rates of diagnosis and death related to the disease among all racial and ethnic groups. (Posted 4/27/21)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Human Research

Study : Insulin resistance linked to differences in breast cancer survival between Black and White women

Most relevant for: Black women

Black women are more likely to die from breast cancer compared to White women. More Black women have a condition called insulin resistance than White women.  This study found that insulin resistance might be one of the reasons that Black women are more likely than White women to die from breast cancer. Additional research is needed to see if lowering insulin levels will improve breast cancer survival in Black women. (07/30/20)

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Study : Racial and ethnic differences in genetic testing among young breast cancer survivors

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 or younger

Genetic testing is recommended for most women who are diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 or younger.  In this study of young women with breast cancer, while the rates of genetic testing  did not differ, the rates of women testing positive for an inherited mutation associated with breast cancer did vary between racial and ethnic groups. (2/27/20)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-Low

Study : Do hair dyes or straighteners increase breast cancer risk?

Most relevant for: Young women who use hair dye or straighteners

Many women use products to color or straighten their hair. A large U.S. study linked the use of permanent hair dye and straighteners to increased breast cancer risk, particularly among black women. This XRAY reviews the limitations of this study and highlights the need for additional research before accepting these conclusions. (1/29/20)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Quality of Writing: Medium-High

Personal Story : A young woman's story of genetic testing and risk-reducing mastectomy

Most relevant for: Young women of color with a BRCA mutation

Alejandra Campoverdi comes from a family with three generations of breast cancer. As a former White House aide and active educator in the Latina community, she has openly shared her story of genetic testing, her BRCA2 mutation and her plans for risk-reducing mastectomy at age 39. (6/6/19)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Gaps in information about breast cancer risk and prevention impact African American women

Most relevant for: African American women who are at high risk for breast cancer

A study showed that African American women with increased breast cancer risk experienced greater burdens in obtaining information at each step compared to white women. Racial differences in preventive choices correlated with differences in information and provider access. (3/14/19)

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