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Ovarian Cancer > Risk Management Options

Ovarian and Fallopian Tube Cancer Risk Management

Every woman is at risk for ovarian and fallopian tube cancer and the risk increases with age. The average lifetime risk for these cancers is slightly more than 1 percent. About 1 out of every 90 women will get ovarian or fallopian tube cancer in her lifetime. Note that when we use "women" we are referring to the sex assigned at birth.

An inherited mutation in one of the genes listed below increases the risk for these cancers, often at a younger age.

Genes with Ovarian Cancer Risk-Management Guidelines

Genetic counseling and testing can help you learn if you have an inherited mutation in one of these genes. There are different expert guidelines for ovarian and fallopian tube cancer risk management, which are based on your level of risk. Read below for more information about different risk-management options. Speak with your healthcare provider to decide on a risk-management plan and schedule that is right for you. 

In the News

Reducing ovarian cancer risk without removing the ovaries

Topic: Reducing ovarian cancer risk without removing the ovaries

A leading ovarian cancer organization has recommended that all women who have pelvic surgery should also consider removing their fallopian tubes to reduce their risk of ovarian cancer. (Posted 7/18/23)

Risk-Management Options

Screening

Screening for ovarian and fallopian tube cancer uses tests to try to catch cancer in its early stages. In high-risk people, regular screening for these cancers may not improve outcomes. Learn more about the benefits and limitations of fallopian tube and ovarian cancer screening.

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Medications to Reduce Risk

Medications such as birth control pills can lower the risk for fallopian tube and ovarian cancer in people with inherited mutations. Learn more about the benefits and risks of these medications.  

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Surgery to Reduce Risk

Risk-reducing surgery is the most effective way to lower risk for ovarian and fallopian tube cancer. Read more about the guidelines and surgery options for people with inherited mutations.

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Last updated February 13, 2024