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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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151 through 160 of 232

Relevance: Medium

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Do physicians recommend breast cancer screenings based on guidelines?

Most relevant for: Women at average risk for breast cancer

Several guidelines help physicians decide when a woman should begin screening for breast cancer and how often she should be screened. However, are these guidelines put into use in the clinic? (8/8/17)

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Do physicians recommend breast cancer screenings based on guidelines?

Relevance: Medium-Low

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Strength of Science: Medium-Low

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Research Timeline: Animal Studies

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Article : Report on vaccines to prevent hereditary cancer

Most relevant for: High risk women who have not had breast cancer

On 05/30/2017, Good Morning America aired a segment entitled “Can a vaccine help prevent breast cancer at its earliest stages?” The story outlines the need for cancer prevention and hints at early research into a cancer vaccine. (8/1/17)

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Report on vaccines to prevent hereditary cancer

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : New cancer risk estimates for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

Most relevant for: Women with an inherited mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2

Cancer risk estimates for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are important because they impact patient decision-making. Until now, almost all risk estimates for mutation carriers were based on results of retrospective studies that looked back on mutation carriers who had cancer. This new study is prospective—it followed almost 10,000 BRCA mutation carriers without cancer to see if or when they developed breast or ovarian cancer. The cancer risk estimates of this study may be more accurate because it followed mutation carriers who did not have cancer over time. (7/28/17)

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New cancer risk estimates for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

Relevance: High

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Quality of Writing: High

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Article : Can your breast cancer come back?

Most relevant for:

Elaine Howley’s piece for US News & World Report, “Can My Breast Cancer Come Back?” examines a common misperception that many breast cancer patients have after completing treatment, and explains what can actually occur. (7/25/17)

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Can your breast cancer come back?

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Study : Gaps in genetic testing and decision-making for women with early-stage breast cancer

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with early stage breast cancer

Genetic testing for cancer risk is now more affordable and easier to obtain. As a result, many breast cancer patients are tested without ever seeing a genetic counselor. Genetic testing results affect treatment decision making, but they can be confusing, especially if patients do not receive genetic counseling. This study looks at breast cancer patients’ experiences following genetic testing and how testing results affect surgical decision making. (7/14/17)

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Gaps in genetic testing and decision-making for women with early-stage breast cancer

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Study : Diet during teen years and early adulthood is linked to breast cancer risk

Most relevant for: Adolescent and young adult women

During teen years, breast tissue grows rapidly in young girls and is more likely to be harmed by substances that are known to cause cancer. Few studies have looked at the relationship between diet during puberty and breast cancer risk. This study looks at how a woman’s diet during their teenage years and early adulthood is associated with breast cancer development later in life. (6/30/17)

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Diet during teen years and early adulthood is linked to breast cancer risk

Relevance: High

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Quality of Writing: High

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Article : FDA busts myths of preventing and treating cancer by eating apricot kernels, herbs, and other ingredients

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with or concerned about their risk for cancer

Maggie Fox (NBC News) writes about a new FDA report that warns of 14 "fraudulent” cancer products claiming to either cure or treat cancer (1). The companies that sell these products claim that many of them also prevent cancer, but are they safe or effective? (6/26/17)

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FDA busts myths of preventing and treating cancer by eating apricot kernels, herbs, and other ingredients

Relevance: Medium

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Cost savings associated with a shorter course or omission of radiation treatment for early-stage breast cancer

Most relevant for:

Breast cancer treatment costs are high. Lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy is a common treatment for early-stage breast cancer; however, patients may receive different radiation regimens, which carry different costs. Authors of this research study wanted to estimate the potential health care cost savings if early-stage breast cancer patients received the least expensive radiation regimen for which they were safely eligible. (6/20/17)

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Cost savings associated with a shorter course or omission of radiation treatment for early-stage breast cancer

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Study : Pregnancy around the time of a breast cancer diagnosis does not negatively affect survival

Most relevant for: Young women diagnosed during or right after pregnancy and young survivors considering pregnancy after breast cancer

The number of women who become pregnant around the time of, or after a breast cancer diagnosis is increasing. However, it is unclear whether pregnancy around the time of a breast cancer diagnosis impacts survival. This recently published study demonstrates that the timing of pregnancy does not negatively affect breast cancer survival rates. (5/24/17)

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Pregnancy around the time of a breast cancer diagnosis does not negatively affect survival

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Does scalp cooling help prevent hair loss after chemotherapy?

Most relevant for: Patient undergoing chemotherapy

Hair loss is one of the most recognized and distressing side effects of some chemotherapies. Two studies looked at the use of scalp cooling therapy to help reduce hair loss after chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. (5/15/17) 

Update: Based on data from clinical trials, the FDA approved Dignicap scalp cooling device for treatment in patients diagnosed with solid tumors who are receiving chemotherapy. 

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Does scalp cooling help prevent hair loss after chemotherapy?