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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Genetic testing for inherited mutations may be helpful for all people with advanced or metastatic cancer

Most relevant for: people with metastatic or recurrent cancer

In a study of nearly 12,000 cancer patients with a variety of cancers, eight percent of participants with metastatic cancer had an inherited mutation in a cancer gene that qualified them for a targeted treatment approved by the FDA or for participation in a clinical trial. The majority of people with metastatic cancer were unaware that they had an inherited mutation, and had not receive gene-directed treatment to which their tumor may have responded. The study authors suggest that genetic testing for inherited mutations may be warranted for all patients with advanced or metastatic cancer. (posted 9/30/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: High

Quality of Writing: High

Study : Among women with breast cancer, who should have genetic testing for an inherited mutation?

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who do not know if they have an inherited mutation in a gene linked to breast cancer

Which breast cancer patients should consider genetic testing? Knowing whether you have an inherited mutation may inform the decisions you and your healthcare provider make about treatment. But it can also increase stress and anxiety. This XRAY reviews a study of how different guidelines affect genetic testing recommendations for people with breast cancer. (8/27/20)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Human Research

Study : Promising research using a PARP inhibitor to treat metastatic breast cancer in people with an inherited PALB2 mutation or a tumor mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2

Most relevant for: People with metastatic breast cancer with an inherited mutation in PALB2 or tumor with a BRCA mutation

Early results of a small study showed that women with metastatic breast cancer and an inherited  mutation in PALB2 or an acquired tumor mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 benefitted from the PARP inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza). (6/18/20)

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Relevance: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Update : PARP inhibitors, rucaparib (Rubraca) and olaparib (Lynparza) receive FDA approval for metastatic prostate cancer

Most relevant for: Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have certain inherited or tumor mutations in DNA repair genes

The FDA approved two PARP inhibitors, rucaparib (Rubraca) and olaparib (Lynparza) for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in men who have certain inherited mutations or tumor mutations. (6/1/20)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Rare mutations in PALB2, CHEK2, and ATM: how much do they increase cancer risk?

Most relevant for: People who tested positive for one of the rare variants in CHEK2, ATM or PALB2 that are covered in this study

As multi-gene panel tests become more common, people are discovering they have mutations in genes that are not understood as well as BRCA. This can make it difficult to give patients accurate assessments of their cancer risk. For example, mutations in PALB2, CHEK2, and ATM are rare, but some specific changes in these genes are even less common. The goal of this international collaboration was to better understand the cancer risks of some very rare PALB2, CHEK2, and ATM mutations. The findings are relevant only to the specific mutations covered in this paper and do not apply to all people with mutations in PALB2, CHEK2, or ATM. (9/27/16)

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