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FORCE's eXaming the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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1 through 10 of 11

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Can tumor tests identify more breast cancer patients who can safely skip chemotherapy?

Most relevant for: Women with breast cancer

Two studies presented at the December 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium looked at how tumor testing can identify patients who may benefit the most and the least from chemotherapy. (3/4/21)

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Can tumor tests identify more breast cancer patients who can safely skip chemotherapy?

Relevance: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Update : FDA approves new imaging drug for detecting spread of prostate cancer

Most relevant for: Men with prostate cancer

On December 1, 2020 the FDA approved a new type of imaging technology to confirm the spread of newly diagnosed prostate cancer that is suspected to be metastatic. The approval also includes use for confirming suspected recurrence in men who have rising PSA after treatment. The approval is based on two clinical trials that showed this new technique to be safe and consistent in accurately detecting cancer that has spread beyond the prostate gland. (1/7/21)

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FDA approves new imaging drug for detecting spread of prostate cancer

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : New PARP inhibitor veliparib showed benefit as first-line treatment for ovarian cancer

Most relevant for: Women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer

Treatment with veliparib may benefit women with advanced ovarian cancer. A recent clinical trial shows that this new PARP inhibitor may delay progression of cancer when combined with chemotherapy and when continued alone as a maintenance therapy. (8/18/20)

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New PARP inhibitor veliparib showed benefit as first-line treatment for ovarian cancer

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: High

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Update : FDA approves the PARP inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza) in combination with bevacizumab (Avastin) as maintenance therapy for some women with advanced ovarian cancer

Most relevant for: Women with advanced ovarian cancer whose tumor has a BRCA mutation or a type of tumor marker called homologous recombination deficiency (HRD)

The FDA has approved the first drug combination to be used as a first-line maintenance therapy for some women with advanced ovarian cancer. (7/7/2020)

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FDA approves the PARP inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza) in combination with bevacizumab (Avastin) as maintenance therapy for some women with advanced ovarian cancer

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Promising research using a PARP inhibitor to treat metastatic breast cancer in people with an inherited PALB2 mutation or a tumor mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2

Most relevant for: People with metastatic breast cancer with an inherited mutation or tumor with a BRCA mutation

Early results of a small study showed that women with metastatic breast cancer and an inherited  mutation in PALB2 or an acquired tumor mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 benefitted from the PARP inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza). (6/18/20)

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Promising research using a PARP inhibitor to treat metastatic breast cancer in people with an inherited PALB2 mutation or a tumor mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Study : Declining use of chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer: examining oncologist recommendations

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with early stage breast cancer

A new study shows that chemotherapy use for early-stage, node-positive and node-negative breast cancers declined from 2013 to 2015. It also reports that oncologists’ recommendations are influenced to differing degrees by patient preferences and tumor test results, despite unchanging health care guidelines. (8/21/18)

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Declining use of chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer: examining oncologist recommendations

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Some women with early-stage breast cancer forego chemotherapy

Most relevant for: People with node-negative, ER-positive breast cancer

A research study named the “Trial Assigning Individualized Options for Treatment” (TAILORx) asked whether chemotherapy is beneficial for women who have mid-range Oncotype DX tumor recurrence scores. This trial — the largest breast cancer treatment trial ever conducted— showed that endocrine therapy alone was as effective as endocrine therapy plus chemotherapy in women with certain types of early-stage breast cancer. The results of this trial are expected to be immediately practice changing (7/20/18)

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Some women with early-stage breast cancer forego chemotherapy

Relevance: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Guideline : Can MammaPrint guide treatment decisions?

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with ER-positive, Her2-negative early-stage breast cancer with 0-3 positive nodes

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recently updated its guidelines for MammaPrint, a genomic tumor test that guides treatment decisions for patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer. The update was based on results from the MINDACT study (11/16/17). 

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Can MammaPrint guide treatment decisions?

Relevance: Medium-Low

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Strength of Science: Medium-Low

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Research Timeline: Animal Studies

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Study : Common genetic change found in some tumors of patients who relapse after aromatase inhibitor treatment

Most relevant for: Patients with ER+ breast cancer

About one in five people diagnosed with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer relapse within 10 years after treatment. Researchers and health care providers do not know why this happens. This early research aims to identify a genetic change in the tumor that may cause relapse, but more studies are needed to understand why patients relapse and who is at risk. (5/3/17)

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Common genetic change found in some tumors of patients who relapse after aromatase inhibitor treatment

Relevance: Medium

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Quality of Writing: High

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Article : A cancer patient’s tumor is genetically profiled—how does that info help treatment?

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with advanced cancer

Jessica Wapner's Scientific American article explores the difficulties of making the vast amount of information acquired from tumor gene tests useful to patients and physicians. (9/20/16). Update: THIS INFORMATION HAS BEEN UPDATED. In late 2017, the FDA approved two separate tumor profiling tests to help guide treatment choices. The FoundationOne CDx (F1CDx) genomic test has been approved to test for 15 different targeted therapies used to treat five types of cancer, including ovarian, colorectal, lung, breast and melanoma. The FDA also approved the MSK-IMPACT and developed for use by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) to scan tumor samples for 468 different cancer-associated mutations or alterations.

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A cancer patient’s tumor is genetically profiled—how does that info help treatment?