Get notified of page updates
Education > XRAY > Search Results

FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
Learn more about the XRAY program

How To Use XRAY
Search for Articles Submit an Article for Review
31 through 39 of 39

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Human Research

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Is there a link between exercise and memory in breast cancer survivors?

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with early stage breast cancer

Exercise has many health benefits, but can it also help improve memory for breast cancer survivors? This research finds that breast cancer survivors who exercised more had less fatigue and distress (anxiety, depression, stress, and/or concern about recurrence) and scored better on memory tests. (8/2/16)

Read More

Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Human Research

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Breast cancer risk model updated for average risk women with genetic, lifestyle and environmental information

Most relevant for: Women at average risk for breast cancer

A number of factors are known to increase breast cancer risk, but some of these factors have not been included in models to predict breast cancer risk. This study looks at an updated model that includes some of these factors, such as genetics, smoking, and drinking. The goal of the model is to give women a more individualized breast cancer risk assessment. (6/29/16)

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Does light alcohol consumption affect your breast cancer risk?

Most relevant for: Women who drink alcohol and are concerned about their breast cancer risk.

Alcohol is known to increase breast cancer risk, but does that include light consumption? This study indicates that some breast cancer occurrences and mortality is due to light alcohol consumption. (06/21/16)

Read More

Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium-High

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Can long periods of fasting protect against breast cancer recurrence?

Most relevant for: Breast cancer survivors

Previous research in mice suggested that long periods of fasting provide protection against factors that are associated with a poor cancer outcome. A new study associates prolonged fasting (13 hours or more) at night with a lower risk of breast cancer recurrence, but no association between fasting time at night and mortality. While these findings are interesting, more research needs to be done to confirm them. In the meantime, breast cancer survivors should discuss any concerns about nutrition with their health care providers. 05/30/16

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Do women who eat a high fiber diet have a lower risk of breast cancer?

Most relevant for: Adolescent and young adult women

Some researchers believe that dietary fiber may decrease breast cancer risk by lowering estrogen levels in the blood. However, many previous studies have failed to find a link between fiber consumption and lower breast cancer risk. The current study suggests that consuming high dietary fiber during adolescence and young adulthood may lower breast cancer risk, but more work needs to be done to confirm this finding. In the meantime, everyone is encouraged to eat a variety of high fiber foods for the many well-documented health benefits. (03/08/16)

Read More

Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Animal Studies

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Sugar promotes tumor growth and metastasis in mouse model breast cancer

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with breast cancer

Previous human studies found associations between high sugar intake and breast cancer risk. This study looked at the direct effect of sugar on breast cancer growth and metastasis in mice. While researchers observed that sugar increased tumor growth and metastasis, more work needs to be done to see if this finding is relevant in humans. It is important to remember, the overall health benefits of limiting sugar intake remain undisputed. (02/02/16)

Read More

Relevance: Low

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Animal Studies

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Do antioxidants encourage the spread of cancer cells?

Most relevant for: The clinical relevance of this study for people is not clear

Scientists do not yet know why some cancers spread to other parts of the body (a process called metastasis). A study in mice suggested that high doses of some antioxidants (chemicals that can protect cells from damage) might actually make it easier for cancer cells to spread. (12/01/2015)

Read More

Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Human Research

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Aerobic exercise lowers estrogen levels in premenopausal women at high risk for breast cancer

Most relevant for: High risk women with a BRCA mutation or a close relative with a BRCA mutation

Many treatments that lower estrogen levels also reduce breast cancer risk. Unfortunately, these treatments are also associated with negative side effects. A recent study looked at the effect of regular aerobic exercise on the estrogen levels of women who are at high risk for breast cancer. (11/14/2015)

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Weight gain associated with breast cancer survivorship

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with early stage (1-3) breast cancer

Weight gain in breast cancer survivors can affect survival and quality-of-life. This study found that breast cancer survivors are more likely to gain weight than women of the same age who are at high risk, but have never been diagnosed with cancer. The study looked at which groups of survivors were more likely to gain weight. (8/24/15)

Read More