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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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201 through 210 of 232

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Dense breast notifications are informative but hard to read and understand

Most relevant for: Women with dense breast tissue on mammograms

Some states offer women dense breast notifications that are meant to explain that dense breasts are risk factors for breast cancer and can hide cancer on mammograms, and to identify appropriate supplemental screening options. But recent research found that this information is often not easy to read or understand, which questions the usefulness of the documents. (6/7/16)

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Dense breast notifications are informative but hard to read and understand

Relevance: Medium

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Study : Can long periods of fasting protect against breast cancer recurrence?

Most relevant for: Breast cancer survivors

Previous research in mice suggested that long periods of fasting provide protection against factors that are associated with a poor cancer outcome. A new study associates prolonged fasting (13 hours or more) at night with a lower risk of breast cancer recurrence, but no association between fasting time at night and mortality. While these findings are interesting, more research needs to be done to confirm them. In the meantime, breast cancer survivors should discuss any concerns about nutrition with their health care providers. 05/30/16

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Can long periods of fasting protect against breast cancer recurrence?

Relevance: Medium

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Do BRCA mutations affect fertility?

Most relevant for: Women with a BRCA mutation who want to become pregnant

Age affects fertility. As women age, their ovaries release eggs that are not as healthy as those released in younger women. Fewer eggs are released each menstrual cycle as women age, making it harder for older women to become pregnant. Are women with BRCA mutations less fertile? Previous research suggested that BRCA mutations might affect women's fertility as she ages. A recent study found that BRCA1 mutation carriers may have slightly lower fertility than women without the same mutation, but more research is needed before this finding is useful for medical decision-making. (5/24/16)

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Do BRCA mutations affect fertility?

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Study : Financial burden affects quality of life of cancer survivors

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with cancer

Cancer-related financial burden can keep survivors from getting the care that they need, yet how this burden affects mental and physical health is still unknown. A study found that almost one-third of cancer survivors report having financial burden; those most likely to be affected were under age 65, female, members of racial or ethnic minority groups, and people who lack access to adequate insurance. (5/17/16)

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Financial burden affects quality of life of cancer survivors

Relevance: Medium

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Study : More patients with invasive breast cancer opting for double mastectomies

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who are recommended to undergo a single mastectomy

Women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer have a number of surgical options. They can have breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) with radiation, a unilateral (single) mastectomy to remove only the tissue from the cancerous breast, or a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), which removes both breasts. A new study finds that more women are opting for CPM, yet overall survival for these patients is not increasing. (5/3/2016)

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More patients with invasive breast cancer opting for double mastectomies

Relevance: Medium

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Cellular diversity in tumors may predict survival for some types of breast cancer

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with breast cancer that is "high-grade" or aggressive

Some tumors are made up of many different types of cells, while others contain generally the same cell type. This study found that among people with high-grade breast cancer, those who have tumors made up of many different cell types have a lower 10-year survival rate than people with tumors containing only a single type of cells. This research is an early step towards developing a new test that can help physicians identify cancers that need more aggressive treatment, but more research is needed before it is ready for clinical use. (4/26/16)

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Cellular diversity in tumors may predict survival for some types of breast cancer

Relevance: Medium

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Is breast cancer risk increased in women who test negative for the BRCA mutation in their family?

Most relevant for: Women from a family with a known BRCA mutation who tested negative for the mutation in the family

Some women who do not carry a BRCA mutation, but come from a BRCA-positive family, still develop breast cancer. This research examines whether these women are at higher risk for breast cancer, or whether their risk is similar to women in the general population. (4/19/16)

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Is breast cancer risk increased in women who test negative for the BRCA mutation in their family?

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Study : Factors that affect the ability to work in people with metastatic cancer

Most relevant for: People living with metastatic cancer

Some patients who live with metastatic cancer either want or need to continue working while coping with symptoms of their disease and treatment. A recent study that looked at over 600 people with metastatic breast, prostate, colon, or lung cancer found that about one-third of them continue working full or part time. People most likely to continue working were those undergoing hormonal treatment and those with less severe symptoms or side effects from treatment. (4/12/16)

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Factors that affect the ability to work in people with metastatic cancer

Relevance: Medium

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Quality of Writing: Medium-Low

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Article : New York Times report demonstrates need for genetic counseling, but doesn’t give the whole story

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with breast cancer

A New York Times report discussed how genetic testing could provide “grim data” without guidance for patients. While this is a valid concern, this report does not sufficiently emphasize certain important issues regarding genetic testing, particularly the need for genetic counseling by a health care provider with expertise in genetics before and after genetic testing. (4/5/16)

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New York Times report demonstrates need for genetic counseling, but doesn’t give the whole story

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: High

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Study : BRCA testing in young women with breast cancer

Most relevant for: Young women diagnosed with breast cancer who have not yet had genetic testing

National guidelines recommend genetic testing for BRCA mutations in young women who are diagnosed with breast cancer. However, little is known about how women decide to get testing, or how they use genetic information to decide on treatment options. This study found that genetic testing is increasing among young breast cancer survivors, and it explores some of the factors that play into patients’ decision making about genetic testing. (3/22/16)

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BRCA testing in young women with breast cancer