Get notified of page updates
Education > XRAY > Search Results

FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
Learn more about the XRAY program

How To Use XRAY
Search for Articles Submit an Article for Review
1 through 10 of 18

Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Women can have safe pregnancies after breast cancer treatment

Most relevant for: Women who have had breast cancer who are considering pregnancy.

In a large analysis of all published studies to date, most women who become pregnant after breast cancer treatment had safe pregnancies, with no increase in their cancer recurrence risk. Infants of mothers treated for breast cancer were more likely to have low birth weight, preterm birth and small size at birth but there was no increase in birth defects. Breast cancer survivors who became pregnant had a similar risk of recurrence and survival as survivors who did not become pregnant. (posted 6/24/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

Read More

Relevance: High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Birth control pills may offer long-term protection against endometrial and ovarian cancer

Most relevant for: People concerned about endometrial, ovarian or breast cancer risk

A large study showed that birth control pills may protect against endometrial and ovarian cancers, even years after use was discontinued. (posted 6/1/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Human Research

Study : Breastfeeding may lower risk of ovarian cancer in women with BRCA mutations

Most relevant for: Women considering breastfeeding who have inherited BRCA mutations.

Data from a large-scale study suggests that breastfeeding may protect against ovarian cancer in women with inherited mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. (1/28/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

Read More

Relevance: High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Is it safe for BRCA mutation carriers to become pregnant following breast cancer?

Most relevant for: Women with a BRCA mutation who are considering pregnancy after breast cancer

New research shows that pregnancy after breast cancer is safe for women with BRCA mutations and their babies. (9/4/19)

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Study : Diagnosis and treatment delays in young women with breast cancer

Most relevant for: Young women who find a breast lump and young women newly-diagnosed with breast cancer

Young women are more likely to have delays in a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.  Factors that affect these delays include pregnancy, breastfeeding, financial concerns and having a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. (8/5/19)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Human Research

Study : Improving outcomes for young women with breast cancer: fertility and childbearing issues

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age

Fertility issues and family planning decisions are prominent concerns for young women with breast cancer. This XRAYS looks at Dr. Ann Partridge’s presentation at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer symposium. Her talk, “Breast cancer in young women: Understanding differences to improve outcomes," focused on initial findings from the Young Women's Breast Cancer Study. Dr. Partridge’s research continues in the currently enrolling POSITIVE trial which tests whether women can safely interrupt adjuvant endocrine therapy in order to get pregnant. (1/7/19)

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Study : Breast cancer risk increases modestly after childbirth

Most relevant for: Women in their childbearing years

Does having children alter the risk of breast cancer? Women who give birth have a lower lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, newer data suggests that breast cancer risk increases immediately after childbirth. A study published in December 2018 examines data from the Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collective Group seeking to clarify this issue. (12/28/18)

Read More

Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Childbearing after breast cancer among young survivors

Most relevant for: Young breast cancer survivors who wish to become pregnant

Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer as an adolescent or young adult often have not yet begun or finished childbearing. Researchers studied the impact of breast cancer and related treatment on birth rates and birth outcomes in young survivors. Overall, adverse birth outcomes were not increased for young survivors compared to women without cancer.  However, women with ER-negative breast cancers had a modestly higher frequency of preterm and low weight births. The authors highlight the need for fertility counseling and potential fertility preserving methods prior to treatment. (5/10/18)

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

Study : Take your time, follow your heart: strategies for communication about family planning

Most relevant for: Young high risk women

When a woman is newly diagnosed with a BRCA mutation, she faces many risk management decisions. Although many of these decisions impact family planning, little guidance is available on how to communicate this information. This study examines female previvors’ advice on effective strategies for discussing family planning decisions. (03/28/18)

Read More

Relevance: Medium-High

Quality of Writing: Medium-High

Article : Coping with the financial burden of breast cancer

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with breast cancer

U.S. News & World Report recently talked to three breast cancer survivors, including two young women, about how they handled out-of-pocket costs and other medical expenses after their cancer diagnosis. (Posted 1/4/18)

Read More