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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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Categories Pregnancy & Fertility

1 through 10 of 22

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Pausing hormone therapy to pursue pregnancy does not increase the short-term risk of early-stage cancer recurrence

Most relevant for: Women with breast cancer who are considering pregnancy

Women who paused hormone therapy treatment of early-stage hormone receptor-positive (HR-positive) breast cancer to attempt to get pregnant had no increase in short-term recurrence. (Posted 11/3/23)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Progestin birth control may slightly increase breast cancer risk

Most relevant for: People who are using or have recently used birth control containing only the hormone progestin

Different types of birth control carry different cancer risks. Birth control using the hormone progestin slightly increases the risk of breast cancer during use and for a few years after use. (Posted 7/10/23)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: Medium

Topic : Impact of new laws on cancer treatment during pregnancy

Most relevant for: People who have cancer who are pregnant

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2022 that abortion is no longer a protected right under the Constitution.  This landmark decision leaves regulation of abortion to the states. Cancer treatment during pregnancy may now be impacted in states that have abortion bans or limitations. (Posted 5/31/23)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Hormonal birth control may reduce ovarian cancer risk in people with BRCA mutations

Most relevant for: Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations who are interested in reducing their ovarian cancer risk

Hormonal birth control pill is linked to reduced ovarian cancer among people with an inherited BRCA mutation. Longer-acting forms of birth control given by implant, injection or as an intrauterine device may be associated with lower ovarian cancer risk for people with an inherited BRCA mutation. (Posted 4/28/23)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Women can have safe pregnancies after breast cancer treatment

Most relevant for: Women who have had breast cancer who are considering pregnancy.

In a large analysis of all published studies to date, most women who become pregnant after breast cancer treatment had safe pregnancies, with no increase in their cancer recurrence risk. Infants of mothers treated for breast cancer were more likely to have low birth weight, preterm birth and small size at birth but there was no increase in birth defects. Breast cancer survivors who became pregnant had a similar risk of recurrence and survival as survivors who did not become pregnant. (posted 6/24/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Birth control pills may offer long-term protection against endometrial and ovarian cancer

Most relevant for: People concerned about endometrial, ovarian or breast cancer risk

A large study showed that birth control pills may protect against endometrial and ovarian cancers, even years after use was discontinued. (posted 6/1/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Human Research

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Breastfeeding may lower risk of ovarian cancer in women with BRCA mutations

Most relevant for: Women considering breastfeeding who have inherited BRCA mutations.

Data from a large-scale study suggests that breastfeeding may protect against ovarian cancer in women with inherited mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. (1/28/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Is it safe for BRCA mutation carriers to become pregnant following breast cancer?

Most relevant for: Women with a BRCA mutation who are considering pregnancy after breast cancer

New research shows that pregnancy after breast cancer is safe for women with BRCA mutations and their babies. (9/4/19)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Study : Diagnosis and treatment delays in young women with breast cancer

Most relevant for: Young women who find a breast lump and young women newly-diagnosed with breast cancer

Young women are more likely to have delays in a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.  Factors that affect these delays include pregnancy, breastfeeding, financial concerns and having a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. (8/5/19)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Human Research

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Improving outcomes for young women with breast cancer: fertility and childbearing issues

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age

Fertility issues and family planning decisions are prominent concerns for young women with breast cancer. This XRAYS looks at Dr. Ann Partridge’s presentation at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer symposium. Her talk, “Breast cancer in young women: Understanding differences to improve outcomes," focused on initial findings from the Young Women's Breast Cancer Study. Dr. Partridge’s research continues in the currently enrolling POSITIVE trial which tests whether women can safely interrupt adjuvant endocrine therapy in order to get pregnant. (1/7/19)

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