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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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1 through 10 of 28

Relevance: Medium-High

Article : Breast cancer risk for transgender men with inherited mutations

Most relevant for: Transgender men with an inherited mutation

There is little information related to the risks and treatment options for transgender men and nonbinary people who are at high-risk for breast cancer due to an inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We review an expert viewpoint on the implications of a BRCA mutation for transgender men undergoing breast removal as part of their gender-affirming care plan. (posted 5/19/22)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : New tool to predict breast cancer risk for Black women

Most relevant for: Black women in the U.S.

An important part of making decisions about breast cancer screening and prevention is knowing your breast cancer risk. Specific tools are used to identify people who would benefit from early and/or additional screening and chemoprevention or those who would most benefit from genetic counseling and testing. Because these tools were developed using data mostly from white women, they are unable to predict cancer risk as well for Black women. To begin to address these gaps, researchers developed a new tool specifically designed to predict breast cancer risk for Black women. This tool has been shown to work well, especially for younger Black women. (posted 3/22/2022)

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Relevance: Medium-Low

Research Timeline: Human Research

Update : Blood tests called liquid biopsies for cancer screening, monitoring and treatment

Most relevant for: People considering a liquid biopsy to screen for cancer

Could a simple blood test change cancer detection, treatment and monitoring? Several companies are offering a type of blood test known as a liquid biopsy to detect multiple cancers at their earliest stages, monitor response to treatment and help choose the best treatment. Although progress has been made using liquid biopsies to treat cancer, these tests have not yet been shown to detect cancer early enough to save lives. (posted 9/29/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Cancer risks of people with inherited PALB2 mutations

Most relevant for: people with inherited PALB2 mutations

In the largest study of people with inherited PALB2 mutations to date, the gene was linked to increased lifetime risk of breast cancer in women and men, ovarian and pancreatic cancer but not prostate or colorectal cancer. (posted 7/1/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Guideline : Expert guidelines on COVID-19 vaccines and timing of breast screening tests

Most relevant for: People considering screening mammography after getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

COVID-19 vaccines work by helping the immune system destroy the virus. Lymph nodes are an important part of the immune system. COVID-19 vaccines may cause temporary swelling in some lymph nodes, which may look suspicious on a mammogram.  The Society for Breast Imaging and other professional organizations have released recommendations for the timing of mammograms after COVID-19 vaccines.  (3/30/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Knowing about an inherited BRCA mutation improves outcomes for women with breast cancer

Most relevant for: Young women with, or at high risk for an inherited BRCA mutation

Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are linked to a high lifetime risk of breast and other cancers. This study shows that women who know that they have a BRCA mutation before they are diagnosed with breast cancer have improved outcomes including diagnosis at earlier stages and improved overall survival. (10/26/20)

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : What is the risk for contralateral breast cancer in women with an inherited BRCA1, BRCA2 or TP53 mutation?

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40

For women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, knowing their risk of breast cancer in the other (contralateral) breast can help them make decisions about surgery and surveillance. Research has shown that women with an inherited mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 have an increased risk for contralateral breast cancer. A British study shows that women with an inherited mutation in the TP53 gene may have an increased risk for contralateral breast cancer, which is even higher greater than the risk of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. (6/6/20)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Human Research

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Cancer risk associated with inherited mutations in Lynch syndrome genes

Most relevant for: People with Lynch syndrome mutations

Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited cause of cancer affecting about 1 in 300 people. People with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of colorectal endometrial and other cancers. A large study followed people with mutations in the Lynch syndrome genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 to determine the risk of other types of cancer. (2/21/20)

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

View Related Clinical Trials

Study : MRI or mammograms for detecting breast cancer in families with unknown genetic mutations?

Most relevant for: People with a personal or family history of cancer where no mutation has been found

MRI and mammograms are used together to detect breast cancer in high-risk women who test positive for a BRCA or other gene mutation that increases the risk for breast cancer. For women with a family history of breast cancer but no known genetic mutation, increased screening is recommended. But what method is best? A recent clinical trial in the Netherlands compared MRI and mammography for this population. (8/15/19)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Study : Diagnosis and treatment delays in young women with breast cancer

Most relevant for: Young women who find a breast lump and young women newly-diagnosed with breast cancer

Young women are more likely to have delays in a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.  Factors that affect these delays include pregnancy, breastfeeding, financial concerns and having a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. (8/5/19)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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