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Survey for Individuals With a Hereditary Cancer Genetic Testing Result That was Later Reclassified

Prevention
Survey for people whose genetic test results were reclassified

Study Contact Information:

Principal investigator: Mitch McElfresh ([email protected])

Faculty advisor: Gwen Reiser ([email protected])


Survey For Individuals With A Hereditary Cancer Genetic Testing Result That Was Later Reclassified

About the Study

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center are conducting an online survey to look into the personal experiences of people who have received reclassified genetic testing results concerning hereditary cancer-related genes. Reclassification is the process of reviewing and revising the interpretation of genetic variants, such as changing a positive result to negative. The study aims to investigate patient perspectives on healthcare providers' communication about reclassification, along with preferred methods for providers to reconnect and convey results.

What the Study Entails

An online survey of 30 questions which takes around 20 minutes to complete. Participants will be compensated for their time through a raffle for the opportunity to receive a gift card.

Take the survey at this link or scan the QR code: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lead Researchers/Study PIs and Affiliation

Institution: University of Nebraska Medical Center

PI: Mitch McElfresh, BS, BA
Chair: Bronson Riley MS, CGC
Faculty advisor: Gwen Reiser, MS, CGC
Co-investigator: Katie Church MS, CGC
Co-investigator: Charlie King MGC, CGC
 

This Study is Open To:

This study is open to:  

  • People who can access and complete an online survey
  • People 19 years or older  
  • Person has received a genetic testing result that was later reclassified  
This Study is Not Open To:

This study is not open to:

  • People under 19 years old
  • People whose genetic testing result has not been reclassified