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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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51 through 56 of 56

Relevance: Medium

Quality of Writing: Medium-Low

Article : New York Times report demonstrates need for genetic counseling, but doesn’t give the whole story

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with breast cancer

A New York Times report discussed how genetic testing could provide “grim data” without guidance for patients. While this is a valid concern, this report does not sufficiently emphasize certain important issues regarding genetic testing, particularly the need for genetic counseling by a health care provider with expertise in genetics before and after genetic testing. (4/5/16)

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Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : What are the genetics underlying 12 different cancer types?

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with cancer

As gene sequencing has become more affordable, researchers and health care providers are now looking for mutations in many genes beyond BRCA1, BRCA2 and others that are associated with known hereditary cancer syndromes. By sequencing thousands of genes rather than just one or two, researchers can better understand which inherited mutations affect cancer risk. In this study, researchers sequenced thousands of genes in patients with one of 12 cancers, including breast, and catalogued which gene mutations are most commonly found in each cancer. (03/01/16)

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Relevance: Medium

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Human Research

Study : How many children with cancer have mutations in genes that increase cancer risk?

Most relevant for: Survivors of childhood cancer and people with a family history of relatives diagnosed with childhood cancers

Many genes are associated with increased cancer risk in adults, but it is unclear how common these mutations are in children with cancer. This study found that about 9% of children with cancer carry mutations in a gene that is known to increase cancer risk. Over half of the mutations were in the TP53 gene, which is associated with increased cancer risk at a young age and increased risk of breast cancer in adults. (12/15/2015)

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Relevance: Low

Strength of Science: Medium

Research Timeline: Animal Studies

Study : Do antioxidants encourage the spread of cancer cells?

Most relevant for: The clinical relevance of this study for people is not clear

Scientists do not yet know why some cancers spread to other parts of the body (a process called metastasis). A study in mice suggested that high doses of some antioxidants (chemicals that can protect cells from damage) might actually make it easier for cancer cells to spread. (12/01/2015)

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Relevance: Low

Quality of Writing: Low

Article : What “The Truth About Cancer” got wrong about BRCA mutations and cancer

Most relevant for: Because this video is full of medical misinformation, it is not relevant for anyone making healthcare decisions

A website called thetruthaboutcancer.com, created a 9-part docu-series titled “The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest” (TACGQ). The video states that Angelina Jolie’s decision to remove her breasts was one made out of fear; one commentator states that her decision was “barbaric." This video contains a lot of dangerous misinformation about BRCA mutations and inherited cancer. FORCE XRAYS provides the following point-by-point analysis on "The Truth About Cancer." (11/10/2015)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium

Study : Impact of familial breast cancer risk on young girls

Most relevant for: Young women and girls from high-risk breast cancer families

Does growing up in a family that is at high risk for breast cancer affect young girls? Recent research found girls from families with BRCA mutations and/or a strong family history of cancer to be as well adjusted as peers of the same age. The one difference was that girls from families facing breast cancer risk had more stress related to breast cancer than their peers. While these findings are reassuring, parents know their children best, and they should ask for help if they believe their daughters are not coping well. (11/03/2015)

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