Education > XRAY > Prostate Cancer

FORCE's eXaming the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
Learn more about the XRAY program

11 through 20 of 37

Relevance: Medium-High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: High

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

pointerResearch Timeline
View Related Clinical Trials

Study : LGBTQ patients recommend improvements for their cancer care

Most relevant for: LGBTQ cancer patients and their healthcare providers.

Little is known about the cancer care experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) patients. This study looks at recommendations from the LGBTQ community for improving their cancer care. (6/20/19)

Read More
LGBTQ patients recommend improvements for their cancer care

Relevance: Medium-High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: Medium-High

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

pointerResearch Timeline

Study : Prevalence of BRCA founder mutations in Bahamian women

Most relevant for: Bahamanian women

Summary:

The Bahamas has the highest known frequency of BRCA mutations among people diagnosed with breast cancer. This study reviewed whether population-based BRCA testing (testing everyone regardless of family or personal history of cancer) would be an effective approach for finding mutation carriers in the Bahamas. (3/4/19)

Read More
Prevalence of BRCA founder mutations in Bahamian women

Relevance: Low

pointerRelevance

Research Timeline: Lab Research

pointerResearch Timeline
View Related Clinical Trials

Article : Promise of a cure for cancer is too good to be true

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with cancer

The Jerusalem Post published an article titled, “A cure for cancer?  Israeli scientists may have found one.” The story profiled a small Israeli company called Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies that has been working on developing new cancer treatments since 2000. The article relied almost entirely on an interview with the company’s chairperson of the board who made a series of unsubstantiated claims that included that, in a year’s time, the company will offer a complete cure for cancer. (2/12/19)

Read More
Promise of a cure for cancer is too good to be true

Relevance: High

pointerRelevance

Quality of Writing: High

pointerQuality of Writing

Article : The cost of cancer care and impact of financial hardship on treatment

Most relevant for: Anyone diagnosed with cancer

Several recent studies on the cost of cancer care show the negative effects on cancer patients. In this XRAYS we review a recent article by Kaiser Health News and associated studies about the financial impact of breast cancer treatment and cost of precision medicine. (2/8/19)

Read More
The cost of cancer care and impact of financial hardship on treatment

Relevance: High

pointerRelevance

Quality of Writing: High

pointerQuality of Writing

Article : The importance of racial diversity in clinical trials

Most relevant for: People who are a member of a racial or ethnic minority group

This article by journalists Caroline Chen and Riley Wong looks at racial disparities between participation in clinical trials and the population of people with cancer. (11/6/18)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

Read More
The importance of racial diversity in clinical trials

Relevance: Medium-Low

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: Medium

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Human Research

pointerResearch Timeline

Study : A new method for determining whether genetic variants in BRCA1 increase cancer risk

Most relevant for: People who have a Variant of Uncertain Significance in a gene associated with cancer risk.

Ever since BRCA1 was discovered, researchers have been trying to understand which of the thousands of possible DNA changes in this gene increase cancer risk and which are harmless changes.  A new study in Nature reports how a cutting-edge technology called “genome editing” may be used to classify changes—known as variants of uncertain significance-in BRCA1 as harmful or harmless. Once validated, this same technology may be used to classify variants in other genes. (9/29/18)

Read More
A new method for determining whether genetic variants in BRCA1 increase cancer risk

Relevance: Medium-High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: Medium

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Human Research

pointerResearch Timeline
View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Immunotherapy may lead to long-term remission of metastatic breast cancer

Most relevant for: People with advanced cancers

Metastatic breast cancer is often difficult to treat. In a new approach, called adoptive cell therapy (ACT), a patient’s own T-cells (a type of cancer-fighting immune cells) are collected, multiplied in a lab, and then returned to the patient. The goal is to enhance the patient’s immune system with many more T-cells that recognize and attack metastasized tumor cells. This study reports on a single patient whose metastatic breast cancer is still in remission (no evidence of disease) after more than 22 months following ACT. (8/16/18)

Read More
Immunotherapy may lead to long-term remission of metastatic breast cancer

Relevance: Medium

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: Medium

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Human Research

pointerResearch Timeline

Study : Evaluation of some direct-to-consumer genetic testing reveals inaccuracies and misinterpretations

Most relevant for: People who are considering or have had direct-to-consumer testing

A clinical genetic testing laboratory examined results from direct-to-consumer genetic testing ordered directly by patients. They found many instances of false positives—reported mutations that were not actually present—and in some cases, reports of variants that "increased risk," but were actually benign. This study emphasized the importance of involving genetics experts in the interpretation of genetic test results. (6/28/18)

Read More
Evaluation of some direct-to-consumer genetic testing reveals inaccuracies and misinterpretations

Relevance: Medium-High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: Medium-High

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Human Research

pointerResearch Timeline
View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Mutations in Lynch syndrome genes MSH6 and PMS2 may be associated with breast cancer

Most relevant for: Women with an MSH6 or PMS2 mutation

Some women with mutations in MSH6 and PMS2, two Lynch syndrome genes, may have a modest (2 to 3-fold) increased risk for breast cancer. (6/14/18 updated 09/25/19)

Read More
Mutations in Lynch syndrome genes MSH6 and PMS2 may be associated with breast cancer

Relevance: High

pointerRelevance

Quality of Writing: High

pointerQuality of Writing

Article : The right not to know when not knowing is dangerous

Most relevant for: People with Icelandic heritage

Healthcare providers are bound by the guiding principle of doing no harm. But how does this concept apply to their patients who have not consented to genetic testing or who do not want to know their results? In that case, is providing test results more harmful or not? Anna Clausen explores these issues in the context of breast cancer gene testing in her Global Health Now article “The Right Not to Know: When Ignorance is Bliss but Deadly.” (4/20/18)

Read More
The right not to know when not knowing is dangerous

This Portal Sponsored By:

AstraZeneca