Education > XRAY > Breast Cancer

FORCE's eXaming the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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81 through 90 of 198

Relevance: High

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Quality of Writing: Medium-High

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Personal Story : Juliet's story: No reconstruction is a post-mastectomy option

Most relevant for: Women who have had or are considering mastectomy without reconstruction

In a March 2018 article from breastcancercare.org, Juliet conveys her personal experience with a breast cancer diagnosis and her decision to not have her breasts reconstructed after her mastectomy. She details the emotional complexity of her thought process and the empowerment she felt in her decisions. (5/24/18)

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Juliet's story: No reconstruction is a post-mastectomy option

Relevance: Medium

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Metastasis is affected by wound healing and inflammation in study on mice

Most relevant for: Cancer patients who will be, or have recently undergone surgery

This study in mice looked at how wound healing after surgery affects metastasis. Researchers found that wound healing caused changes in the mouse immune system that allowed some cancer cells to grow, but that treatment with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) reduced inflammation and frequency of metastases. While this research is promising, it remains to be seen if similar effects occur in humans. (5/17/18)

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Metastasis is affected by wound healing and inflammation in study on mice

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Childbearing after breast cancer among young survivors

Most relevant for: Young breast cancer survivors who wish to become pregnant

Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer as an adolescent or young adult often have not yet begun or finished childbearing. Researchers studied the impact of breast cancer and related treatment on birth rates and birth outcomes in young survivors. Overall, adverse birth outcomes were not increased for young survivors compared to women without cancer.  However, women with ER-negative breast cancers had a modestly higher frequency of preterm and low weight births. The authors highlight the need for fertility counseling and potential fertility preserving methods prior to treatment. (5/10/18)

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Childbearing after breast cancer among young survivors

Relevance: Medium-High

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Guideline : American Heart Association examines the challenges of cardiovascular disease and breast cancer

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with breast cancer

Current breast cancer treatments can negatively affect cardiovascular health.  Recently, the American Heart Association released its first scientific statement on cardiovascular disease and breast cancer.  This statement includes a comprehensive overview of the prevalence of both diseases, shared risk factors, cardiotoxic effects of therapy and the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease in breast cancer patients. (5/2/18)

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American Heart Association examines the challenges of cardiovascular disease and breast cancer

Relevance: High

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Quality of Writing: High

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Article : The right not to know when not knowing is dangerous

Most relevant for: People with Icelandic heritage

Healthcare providers are bound by the guiding principle of doing no harm. But how does this concept apply to their patients who have not consented to genetic testing or who do not want to know their results? In that case, is providing test results more harmful or not? Anna Clausen explores these issues in the context of breast cancer gene testing in her Global Health Now article “The Right Not to Know: When Ignorance is Bliss but Deadly.” (4/20/18)

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The right not to know when not knowing is dangerous

Relevance: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : FDA updates report on risk of lymphoma from breast implants

Most relevant for: Women who currently have textured implants or expanders or who have had them in the past

Note: On 07/25/19, the FDA announced a recall of Allergan BIOCELL textured implants and expanders, due to their association with BIA-ALCL. 

In March 2017, the Food and Drug Administration reported that patients with breast implants may be at increased risk for a rare type of lymphoma. This was covered in a previous XRAYS review. The FDA has continued to collect data since the first reported association in 2011. Recently, the agency released an update on the number of reported cases of breast implant-associated lymphoma and lifetime risk estimates for women with textured breast implants. (04/02/18)

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FDA updates report on risk of lymphoma from breast implants

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Study : Take your time, follow your heart: strategies for communication about family planning

Most relevant for: Young high risk women

When a woman is newly diagnosed with a BRCA mutation, she faces many risk management decisions. Although many of these decisions impact family planning, little guidance is available on how to communicate this information. This study examines female previvors’ advice on effective strategies for discussing family planning decisions. (03/28/18)

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Take your time, follow your heart: strategies for communication about family planning

Relevance: Medium

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Update : FDA approves at-home test kits for inherited cancer: how useful are they?

Most relevant for: People who are considering or have had direct-to-consumer testing through 23andMe

Genetic testing for health conditions (such as risk for cancer) typically requires a prescription from a doctor. Until recently, direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing has focused on tests to learn your ancestry and find of unknown branches of family trees. A laboratory called 23andMe that provides direct-to-consumer genetic testing has been given FDA approval to report results for 3 mutations found in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The FDA statement provides details about this approval and warns people about the limitations of the 23andMe test. (03/19/18)

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FDA approves at-home test kits for inherited cancer: how useful are they?

Relevance: Medium-High

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Quality of Writing: Medium

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Article : Insurance companies are more than curious about your genetic test results

Most relevant for: People considering testing for an inherited gene mutation

An article on CBSNews.com addressed why insurance companies, particularly long-term insurance companies, might want to know which of their policy holders and potential policy holders have a gene that raises their risk for cancer. The article discusses genetic discrimination by insurance companies that provide long term care policies. Federal laws protect people with gene mutations from discrimination in health insurance. No such federal laws exist for life insurance, disability insurance or long term care. (3/13/18)

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Insurance companies are more than curious about your genetic test results

Relevance: Low

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Research Timeline: Animal Studies

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Study : Is asparagus linked to breast cancer metastasis?

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with breast cancer

A new study published in the journal Nature shows that asparagine, a protein building block that takes its name from asparagus, promotes the spread of breast cancer in mice. The study by cancer experts from Britain, Canada and the U.S. investigated whether limiting the levels of asparagine in mice could reduce tumor metastasis. (3/2/18)

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Is asparagus linked to breast cancer metastasis?

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