Education > XRAY > Breast Cancer

FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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1 through 10 of 210

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Genetic testing for inherited mutations may be helpful for all people with advanced or metastatic cancer

Most relevant for: People with metastatic or recurrent cancer

In a study of nearly 12,000 cancer patients with a variety of cancers, eight percent of participants with metastatic cancer had an inherited mutation in a cancer gene that qualified them for a targeted treatment approved by the FDA or for participation in a clinical trial. The majority of people with metastatic cancer were unaware that they had an inherited mutation, and had not receive gene-directed treatment to which their tumor may have responded. The study authors suggest that genetic testing for inherited mutations may be warranted for all patients with advanced or metastatic cancer. (posted 9/30/21)

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Genetic testing for inherited mutations may be helpful for all people with advanced or metastatic cancer

Relevance: Medium-Low

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Update : Liquid biopsies for cancer screening, monitoring and treatment

Most relevant for: People considering a liquid biopsy to screen for cancer

Could a simple blood test change cancer detection, treatment and monitoring? Several companies are offering a type of blood test known as a liquid biopsy to detect multiple cancers at their earliest stages, monitor response to treatment and help choose the best treatment. Although progress has been made using liquid biopsies to treat cancer, these tests have not yet been shown to detect cancer early enough to save lives. (posted 9/29/21)

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Liquid biopsies for cancer screening, monitoring and treatment

Relevance: Medium-High

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Quality of Writing: High

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Article : Transgender peoples' perspectives of being diagnosed with gender-associated cancer

Most relevant for: transgender people

An ABC News article provides viewpoints and data that conveys the added stress experienced by transgender and gender-nonconforming people when they are diagnosed with gender-associated cancer (e.g., ovarian or prostate cancer) that does not match their gender identity. (posted 9/13/21)

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Transgender peoples' perspectives of being diagnosed with gender-associated cancer

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Update : Pembrolizumab receives FDA approval for people with early-stage, triple-negative breast cancer

Most relevant for: People with early-stage, triple-negative breast cancer who have a high risk for recurrence

The FDA approved the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab (Keytruda) for the treatment of early-stage triple-negative breast cancer that has a high risk for recurrence.  This marks the first approval for this type of drug, known as an immune checkpoint inhibitor, for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. (posted 9/2/21)

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Pembrolizumab receives FDA approval for people with early-stage, triple-negative breast cancer

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Drinking coffee or tea may improve survival after breast cancer

Most relevant for: Women with breast cancer who drink coffee or tea.

In a study of 8,900 women with stage 1, 2 or 3 breast cancer, those who drank coffee survived longer after a breast cancer diagnosis than those who did not drink coffee. Both coffee and tea were linked to improved survival from any cause. Several factors were linked to greater coffee or tea consumption, so this finding must be taken with some caution. However, breast cancer survivors who are regular coffee or tea drinkers may find this research reassuring.  (posted 8/31/21)

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Drinking coffee or tea may improve survival after breast cancer

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Frequency of inherited mutations linked to breast cancer are similar in Black and white women

Most relevant for: Non-Hispanic Black and white women with breast cancer

The CARRIERS study looked at the rate of inherited mutations in women with and without breast cancer. In an extension of the CARRIERS study, researchers found no difference in the frequency of inherited mutations in breast cancer genes among Black and white women with breast cancer. A few individual genes differed in frequency: BRCA2 and PALB2 mutations were seen more often in Black women, while CHEK2 mutations were seen less often. Researchers concluded that race should not be used to determine who is referred for genetic testing. (posted 8/13/21)

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Frequency of inherited mutations linked to breast cancer are similar in Black and white women

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Guideline : ASCO guidelines recommend olaparib for people with early-stage, high-risk breast cancer and an inherited BRCA mutation

Most relevant for: People with early-stage HER2-negative breast cancer and an inherited BRCA mutation

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has updated their breast cancer treatment guidelines to include treatment with the PARP inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza) for one year after completing chemotherapy, surgery and radiation (if used) to improve outcomes of people with an inherited mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 with early-stage, HER2-negative breast cancer who have a high risk for recurrence. (posted 8/6/21)

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ASCO guidelines recommend olaparib for people with early-stage, high-risk breast cancer and an inherited BRCA mutation

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: High

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Update : Breast cancer disparities in Black Americans

Most relevant for: Black women in the US

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) released a 2020 report about cancer disparities among racial and ethnic groups in the United States. In this review, we highlight findings on the burden of breast cancer in Black women. (posted 8/5/21)

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Breast cancer disparities in Black Americans

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Cancer risks of people with inherited PALB2 mutations

Most relevant for: people with inherited PALB2 mutations

In the largest study of people with inherited PALB2 mutations to date, the gene was linked to increased lifetime risk of breast cancer in women and men, ovarian and pancreatic cancer but not prostate or colorectal cancer. (posted 7/1/21)

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Cancer risks of people with inherited PALB2 mutations

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Women can have safe pregnancies after breast cancer treatment

Most relevant for: Women who have had breast cancer who are considering pregnancy.

In a large analysis of all published studies to date, most women who become pregnant after breast cancer treatment had safe pregnancies, with no increase in their cancer recurrence risk. Infants of mothers treated for breast cancer were more likely to have low birth weight, preterm birth and small size at birth but there was no increase in birth defects. Breast cancer survivors who became pregnant had a similar risk of recurrence and survival as survivors who did not become pregnant. (posted 6/24/21)

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Women can have safe pregnancies after breast cancer treatment

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