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Making Sense of Cancer Headlines

FORCE's XRAYS program, funded by the CDC, is a reliable resource for young breast cancer survivors and high-risk women to navigate through breast cancer research related news and information.

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XRAYS - Making Sense of Cancer Headlines

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XRAYS: Making Sense of Cancer Headlines


About the XRAYS Program

FORCE developed our eXamining the Relevance of Articles for Young Survivors (XRAYS) program to empower young breast cancer survivors and high-risk women by providing tools for evaluating reports of new breast cancer-related research. Funded by the CDC, XRAYS will provide reviews and ratings of news media articles on breast cancer research to help young breast cancer survivors better understand research that is relevant to them. Learn more about the XRAYS program

 

Featured Studies and Articles

XRAYS Rating

ARTICLE: Can lifestyle changes impact breast cancer risk?

A recent New York Times article shared how “adopting protective living habits”  could help keep breast cancer “at bay”.  While many of these lifestyle changes and strategies like not smoking, avoiding weight gain, reducing alcohol consumption, eating a heart-healthy diet, and increasing physical activity have been shown to reduce breast cancer risk, there are other risk factors that one cannot control such as having a BRCA or other mutation that significantly increases breast cancer risk. Importantly, no one strategy has been proven to totally eliminate breast cancer risk. However many of these approaches have overall health benefits. (9/21/2017)

XRAYS Rating

STUDY: Does expanded genetic testing benefit Jewish women diagnosed with breast cancer?

Carrying a BRCA gene mutation increases the risk of cancer in both women and men. Such information is valuable for people diagnosed with cancer and can affect medical decisions for both the patient and his or her family members. Approximately 2% of people of Ashkenazi Jewish (Eastern European) descent carry one of three common BRCA gene mutations. For Ashkenazi Jewish women diagnosed with breast cancer who do not carry one of the three common BRCA mutations, little is known about their chance of carrying another hereditary mutation that may increase risk. This study looked at how often Ashkenazi Jewish women diagnosed with breast cancer were found to carry mutations other than the three common BRCA gene mutations found among individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. (09/13/17)

XRAYS Rating

STUDY: Breast cancers can disappear without treatment: fact or fiction?

Previous studies and news headlines have reported that it is possible for breast cancers to regress or disappear on their own. Is this true? The authors of the current research study show that of 479 untreated breast cancers detected by screening mammography, none regressed or spontaneously disappeared on their own. (9/7/17)

XRAYS Rating

STUDY: Does aspirin lower a woman’s breast cancer risk?

Women who take aspirin regularly may have a reduced risk of breast cancer. However, previous studies have reported mixed results—some suggest risk is lowered with aspirin while others do not see a protective effect. Few of these studies have looked at whether this potential benefit of aspirin is linked to specific types of breast cancer. This study found a modest reduction in breast cancer risk for women who took a low-dose aspirin at least three times per week, but only for one subtype of breast cancer. Women who took aspirin were less likely to develop ER/PR-positive/Her2- negative breast cancer, the most common type of breast cancer. This study found no breast cancer risk reduction for women who used regular-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). (8/29/17)

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