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Search Results: Prevention, Detection & Risk + Prostate Cancer (5 results)

1 through 5 of 5
Research Study to Help Improve Family Communication About Inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations
Prevention:

Breast, Ovarian, Pancreatic, Prostate

Research Study to Help Improve Family Communication About Inherited Mutations

The Ohio State University and FORCE want to understand if a family communication guide for people with BRCA mutations is helpful and if it’s also useful to have a video that you can text or email to family members that explains your BRCA mutation. We are currently looking for people between the ages of 18-80 who have mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2, have an active email address, and an internet capable device like a computer, tablet, or smartphone.  Participants will be asked to complete a total of 3 surveys.  Participants will be randomly assigned to either receive just the communication guide or the guide plus the sharable.  Each survey will take 10-15 minutes (the study could take up to 1.5 hours to complete depending on how much time you spend reviewing the study materials). 

You can access the study consent and survey here: https://redcap.link/OSUForceStudy

More info
PHACT Study
Prevention:

Breast, Ovarian, Prostate, Pancreatic, Melanoma

PHACT Study: Population Health and Cancer Testing

The PHACT study offers genetic testing to women and men of Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jewish ancestry, age 21 or older. This group is at least ten times more likely than the general population to inherit certain kinds of genetic mutations associated with cancer risk. The study is open to people who live in one of the nine Bay Area counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma).  By participating in the UCSF Population Health and Cancer Testing (PHACT) study you will be provided with a saliva collection kit from Color Genomics, a genetic laboratory. Thirty genes will be analyzed, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, to identify mutations that increase the chance of cancer in both men and women of Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jewish ancestry and genetic counseling support will be available with every test.  For more information, visit the UCSF Center for BRCA Research. 

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Men at High Genetic Risk for Prostate Cancer
Prevention:

Prostate

Men at High Genetic Risk for Prostate Cancer

The National Cancer Institute recently opened a clinical trial for prostate cancer screening in men who are at high risk for prostate cancer due to an inherited mutation. This is trial is for men without prostate cancer, ages 30 to 75, who have tested positive for Lynch syndrome (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM) or BRCA1, BRCA2, HOXB13, ATM, NBN, TP53, CHEK2, PALB2, RAD51C RAD51D, BRIP1, FANCA. The trial involves screening MRI of the prostate every two years and biopsy of the prostate if the MRI is abnormal. There is no cost for travel or study-related tests.

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Genetic Education for Men (GEM Study)
Prevention:

Prostate, Pancreatic

A Study in Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Families to Provide Men With Up-To-Date Information About the Personal Importance of Genetic Testing (GEM)

The Genetic Education for Men or GEM study, is a clinical trial evaluating educational tools for men from families in which a BRCA1/2 gene mutation has been identified. In order to identify untested men from BRCA1/2 families, we are seeking women who have received positive BRCA1/2 test results and have at least one untested male relative.

Women interested in the study should contact the project coordinator, Mary Kate Ladd, by phone at (877) 687-2720 (toll-free) or by email.

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Study for People with Unexpected Genetic Results
Prevention:

Breast, Ovarian, Pancreatic, Prostate

Genomic Services Research Program Study for People with Unexpected Genetic Results

A new study is recruiting people who received unexpected genetic test results about their cancer risk after having genetic testing done for some other reason.

This is a study of people with "secondary results” from genetic testing. Secondary results are unexpected. They are not related to the reason the person had the genetic test but are shared because they may be very important to the person’s health. Most secondary results have to do with high risks for health problems that can be treated or prevented. Many of these results are related to cancer risk. If you think you have received a secondary result, you may be eligible to join this study.

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Research Search Tool Sponsored By:

Supported by a cooperative agreement from the
Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute: PCORI EAIN-00055

and by:

Eisai