FORCE Blog

This blog will cover topics of interest that affect our community. Unless otherwise stated, the blog articles will be written by Sue Friedman, Executive Director of FORCE.

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Genetic Testing

April 22, 2020

National Minority Cancer Awareness Month: Is the Cancer in Your Family Hereditary?

Hereditary cancers run in families. They are caused by a gene mutation that can be passed down from fathers and mothers to their sons and daughters. Hereditary cancers can occur in people of all races, ethnicities and walks of life. Everyone should ask themselves whether the cancer in their family may be hereditary. Which cancers … + read more

March 4, 2020

Learning I Had Lynch Syndrome Helped Save My Life

After five years with no evidence of disease (NED), Wenora Johnson’s colon cancer returned and her oncologist recommended genetic testing. She tested positive for Lynch syndrome, an inherited syndrome associated with a genetic predisposition to different types of cancer. Today, Wenora is a three-time cancer survivor, advocate and FORCE volunteer. With Lynch syndrome Awareness Day … + read more

August 12, 2019

My CDH1 Mutation and Why I Chose Preventive Gastrectomy

by Jonathan Grossman On January 4, 2018, my mom died of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer. She carried a CDH1 mutation that we only learned about after her diagnosis. Doctors diagnosed her with the disease roughly three years before she died. Originally, her doctors told her she had only months to live. The gene and cancer … + read more

May 30, 2019

Alert: Cancer Genetic Testing Should Be Performed in the Health Care Setting

by Lisa Schlager and Sue Friedman There is a flood of information available about genetic tests for cancer risk in the media, and even at community events, such as health fairs and senior centers. If these promotions have caught your attention and you are considering testing, there is important information that you should know first. … + read more

November 28, 2018

You Don’t Need a Family History of Cancer to Benefit from Genetic Testing

by Sue Friedman Many people mistakenly believe that genetic testing for inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, Lynch Syndrome, and other genes is only appropriate for people with many cases of cancer in their family. National guidelines—based on the latest research—state otherwise. There are situations where a single case of cancer in a family is enough … + read more

June 14, 2018

Me and My MSH6 Mutation: Ever Searching for Answers

by Aya It all started with Mother’s histopathology report on her partially resected small bowel. She had small bowel cancer. With my middle name being “I-want-to-know-more,” I asked for a pathology report after a post-op consultation with her surgeon where future management was discussed.  When I read the report at home, I noticed an aspect … + read more

July 25, 2017

Why I Asked My Mom to Undergo Genetic Testing After Her Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis

by Lisa Rezende, PhD When my mom was first diagnosed with ovarian cancer at the age of 55 in 2001, there were many reasons why she didn’t pursue genetic testing. National guidelines didn’t automatically recommend genetic counseling and/or testing. My family history was limited. While my grandmother had breast cancer, she was diagnosed after menopause, … + read more

May 3, 2017

Genetic Testing Informs Important Medical Decisions for Three Generations in a Family

When Holly Jonas of Long Island, NY learned that her mother had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer at the age of 79, it felt like déjà vu. Her mom, who has a BRCA1 gene mutation, was already a cancer survivor, having been diagnosed with breast cancer at age 48. Believing that “knowledge is power,” Holly … + read more

March 30, 2017

Genetic Testing Results In An Early Stage Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis

After discovering that her mother carried the BRCA1 mutation, Ilana Feuchter of Vienna, Virginia decided to get tested as well, a decision that would ultimately lead to her diagnosis of Stage 2 ovarian cancer in November of 2013. Ilana’s journey began in the Spring of 2013 after her mother was diagnosed with a cancer of … + read more

August 24, 2015

XRAYS Program Looks Behind the Headlines to Make Sense of Cancer Research

FORCE is proud to launch our new program, eXamining the Relevance of Articles for Young Survivors (XRAYS). Funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the XRAYS program was developed to meet a growing need as more and more medical research articles on breast cancer are making the headlines. With the rise of social media, more consumers are turning … + read more

Connect with others.

Call our Helpline

Our helpline offers peer support for people concerned about hereditary cancer. All calls are confidential. Call any time.

Join a Local Group

FORCE has outreach groups throughout the United States and in Essex, United Kingdom that meet periodically to offer peer support, and share resources.

FORCE:Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered