XRAY — Behind the Cancer Headlines

FORCE's eXaming the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.

SEARCH RESULTS: 16 results

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Relevance: Medium-High

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium-Low

Strength of Science

Study: Do hair dyes or straighteners increase breast cancer risk?

Most relevant for: young women who use hair dye or straighteners

Many women use products to color or straighten their hair. A large U.S. study linked the use of permanent hair dye and straighteners to increased breast cancer risk, particularly among black women. This XRAY reviews the limitations of this study and highlights the need for additional research before accepting these conclusions. (1/29/20)

Relevance: High

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium

Strength of Science

Study: How does a breast cancer diagnosis affect employment of young women?

Most relevant for: Young women with breast cancer

Most young women who are diagnosed with breast cancer remain employed one year after their diagnosis. Among breast cancer patients who were unemployed a year later, half reported that their unemployment was due to health issues. The issues that were most associated with unemployment were stage of cancer and financial stress prior to diagnosis. (1/10/20)

Relevance: Medium-High

Relevance

Strength of Science: High

Strength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Research Timeline

Study: LGBTQ patients recommend improvements for their cancer care

Most relevant for: LGBTQ cancer patients and their healthcare providers.

Little is known about the cancer care experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) patients. This study looks at recommendations from the LGBTQ community for improving their cancer care. (6/20/19)

Relevance: Medium-High

Relevance

Quality of Writing: Medium-High

Quality of Writing

Personal Story: A young woman's story of genetic testing and risk-reducing mastectomy

Most relevant for: Young women of color with a BRCA mutation

Alejandra Campoverdi comes from a family with three generations of breast cancer. As a former White House aide and active educator in the Latina community, she has openly shared her story of genetic testing, her BRCA2 mutation and her plans for risk-reducing mastectomy at age 39. (6/6/19)

Relevance: High

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Strength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Research Timeline

Study: Gaps in information about breast cancer risk and prevention impact African American women

Most relevant for: African American women who are at high risk for breast cancer

A study showed that African American women with increased breast cancer risk experienced greater burdens in obtaining information at each step compared to white women. Racial differences in preventive choices correlated with differences in information and provider access. (3/14/19)

Relevance: High

Relevance

Quality of Writing: High

Quality of Writing

Article: The importance of racial diversity in clinical trials

Most relevant for: People who are a member of a racial or ethnic minority group

This article by journalists Caroline Chen and Riley Wong looks at racial disparities between participation in clinical trials and the population of people with cancer. (11/6/18)

Relevance: High

Relevance

Strength of Science: High

Strength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Research Timeline

Study: Disparities in research impact breast screening guidelines

Most relevant for: Women at average risk for breast cancer

For women at average risk of breast cancer, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) currently recommends beginning annual breast cancer screening at age 50. However, because these guidelines are largely based on data from white women, they may not be sensitive to racial differences.  A new study assesses the age distribution of breast cancer cases across race/ethnicity in the U.S. (6/21/18)

Relevance: High

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium

Strength of Science

Study: Alcohol and breast cancer risk in African American women

Most relevant for: African American women who would like to lower their breast cancer risk

The link between alcohol intake and breast cancer is well known, but most studies have involved only White women. Recently, a large study of more than 22,000 African American (AA) women found that similar to White women, increased alcohol consumption is associated with a greater risk of breast cancer. (10/27/17)

Relevance: Medium

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium

Strength of Science

Study: Breast cancer rates are rapidly increasing among Asian women in California

Most relevant for: Asian American women

The majority of racial groups in the United States have seen declines in breast cancer rates. However, this study provides new insights into the patterns of breast cancer rates in Asian American subgroups in California. Using 26 years of data, this research found that breast cancer is rapidly increasing among this population, contrasting to a decline in rates among non-Hispanic white women in California and nationwide. (8/15/17)

Relevance: Medium-High

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Strength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Research Timeline

Study: A step in the development of a new breast cancer risk assessment tool for Hispanic women

Most relevant for: Hispanic women

Current tools used to calculate breast cancer risk make their estimations based on data from non-Hispanic white women and may not accurately predict breast cancer risk in women of other races and ethnicities. With further testing, a new risk assessment tool developed specifically for Hispanic women could more accurately predict breast cancer risk in women who do not have mutations in BRCA or other genes associated with hereditary breast cancer. (02/07/17)

Relevance: Medium-High

Relevance

Quality of Writing: High

Quality of Writing

Personal Story: Male transgender breast cancer patient shares his experience in NYT piece

Most relevant for: Transgender men with, or at high risk for breast cancer

Denise Grady’s New York Times piece presents the struggles faced by Eli Oberman, a male transgender patient who was diagnosed with breast cancer, including the difficulty of being the only male patient in gynecologist waiting rooms that are full of women. (12/21/16)

Relevance: Medium

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium

Strength of Science

Study: Breast cancer mortality among Hispanic women in the United States varies by country of origin

Most relevant for:

"Hispanic" is a broad ethnic category that includes people from numerous countries. When discussing breast cancer statistics, Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans and people whose families originated in Central and South America are typically grouped into one Hispanic category. A new study looked at whether the country of origin affected breast cancer prevalence and mortality rates in Hispanic women in the U.S. (10/25/16)

Relevance: Medium-High

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Strength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Research Timeline

Study: Racial disparities in BRCA testing: Why?

Most relevant for: African American women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer

Black women receive BRCA testing less frequently than white women. Why is that? Researchers thought the reason might be that black and white women see different health care providers. However, new research suggests that disparities in physician recommendations for testing are the cause: black women with breast cancer were less likely to receive physician recommendations for BRCA testing than white women with breast cancer. There is a need to ensure equity in physician testing recommendations for black women. (7/21/16)

Relevance: Medium-High

Relevance

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Strength of Science

Study: Financial burden affects quality of life of cancer survivors

Most relevant for: People diagnosed with cancer

Cancer-related financial burden can keep survivors from getting the care that they need, yet how this burden affects mental and physical health is still unknown. A study found that almost one-third of cancer survivors report having financial burden; those most likely to be affected were under age 65, female, members of racial or ethnic minority groups, and people who lack access to adequate insurance. (5/17/16)

Relevance: High

Relevance

Strength of Science: High

Strength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Research Timeline

Study: BRCA mutations more common than expected in young black women with breast cancer

Most relevant for: Young black women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer

Most estimates of the percentage of breast cancer patients with mutations in BRCA are based on studies in white women. These researchers found that black women diagnosed at a young age with breast were twice as likely to have a BRCA mutation than previously reported based on studies in white women with breast cancer diagnosed in the same age categories. This study shows how important it is for all black women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at or before age 50 to be referred for genetic counseling and testing. (9/29/15)

Relevance: Medium-High

Relevance

Strength of Science: High

Strength of Science

Study: All DCIS is not the same: Young women and African American women at higher risk after DCIS diagnosis

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with DCIS

Diagnoses of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), sometimes called stage 0 breast cancer, have increased in recent decades. Many people with DCIS wonder if they need aggressive treatment. A study looking at the survival of over 100,000 women found that breast cancer mortality after DCIS is low (3%), and identified groups of women who are at higher risk after DCIS. (9/8/15)

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