Education > XRAY > Search Results

FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
Learn more about the XRAY program

1 through 8 of 8

Relevance: High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: High

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

pointerResearch Timeline
View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Frequency of inherited mutations linked to breast cancer are similar in Black and white women

Most relevant for: Non-Hispanic Black and white women with breast cancer

The CARRIERS study looked at the rate of inherited mutations in women with and without breast cancer. In an extension of the CARRIERS study, researchers found no difference in the frequency of inherited mutations in breast cancer genes among Black and white women with breast cancer. A few individual genes differed in frequency: BRCA2 and PALB2 mutations were seen more often in Black women, while CHEK2 mutations were seen less often. Researchers concluded that race should not be used to determine who is referred for genetic testing. (posted 8/13/21)

Read More
Frequency of inherited mutations linked to breast cancer are similar in Black and white women

Relevance: High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: High

pointerStrength of Science

Quality of Writing: High

pointerQuality of Writing
View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Among women with breast cancer, who should have genetic testing for an inherited mutation?

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who do not know if they have an inherited mutation in a gene linked to breast cancer

Which breast cancer patients should consider genetic testing? Knowing whether you have an inherited mutation may inform the decisions you and your healthcare provider make about treatment. But it can also increase stress and anxiety. This XRAY reviews a study of how different guidelines affect genetic testing recommendations for people with breast cancer. (8/27/20)

Read More
Among women with breast cancer, who should have genetic testing for an inherited mutation?

Relevance: High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: Medium-High

pointerStrength of Science
View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Racial and ethnic differences in genetic testing among young breast cancer survivors

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 or younger

Genetic testing is recommended for most women who are diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 or younger.  In this study of young women with breast cancer, while the rates of genetic testing  did not differ, the rates of women testing positive for an inherited mutation associated with breast cancer did vary between racial and ethnic groups. (2/27/20)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

Read More
Racial and ethnic differences in genetic testing among young breast cancer survivors

Relevance: Medium-High

pointerRelevance

Research Timeline: Post Approval

pointerResearch Timeline

Guideline : Breast surgeons recommend genetic testing for all breast cancer patients

Most relevant for: Anyone diagnosed with breast cancer

Summary: 

The American Society of Breast Surgeons published statement on genetic testing for hereditary breast cancer on February 10, 2019. It includes recommendations about who should be tested. Among these is the recommendation that all breast cancer patients get genetic testing, as well as women who do not have breast cancer but fit the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (3/25/19)

Read More
Breast surgeons recommend genetic testing for all breast cancer patients

Relevance: Medium-High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: High

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

pointerResearch Timeline

Study : Inherited breast cancer in Nigerian women

Most relevant for: Nigerian women or women of Nigerian descent who have breast cancer

A new study shows that among Nigerian women, one in eight cases of breast cancer is due to an inherited mutation in BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 or TP53. (12/5/18)

Read More
 Inherited breast cancer in Nigerian women

Relevance: High

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: High

pointerStrength of Science

Research Timeline: Post Approval

pointerResearch Timeline
View Related Clinical Trials

Study : Should biannual MRIs replace annual mammograms in high-risk women?

Most relevant for: Women at increased risk for breast cancer due to an inherited mutation

The risk of breast cancer is exceptionally high in women who have a personal or family history of breast cancer or who carry a mutation in BRCA or certain other genes. More frequent screening is one strategy for early detection of breast cancer for these women. Study results presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium suggest that MRI screening every 6 months may be more effective than the currently recommended annual breast MRI and annual mammogram in detecting early stage breast cancers-which are more treatable-in high-risk women. (2/1/18)

Read More
Should biannual MRIs replace annual mammograms in high-risk women?

Relevance: Medium-High

pointerRelevance

Quality of Writing: High

pointerQuality of Writing

Article : Parents face challenges when deciding the best time to tell children that they may be at high risk for cancer

Most relevant for: Parents who have an inherited gene mutation

When certain types of cancers run in families, genetic testing can determine whether the cause is hereditary. Genetic testing can help family members understand their cancer risk and make medical decisions to stay healthy. A test result can provide significant insight, but it also creates challenges for parents, because gene mutations that cause hereditary cancers can be passed from mothers and fathers to sons and daughters. People with these mutations must make difficult decisions about when to tell their children that they too may have inherited the mutation. (8/22/2017)

Read More
Parents face challenges when deciding the best time to tell children that they may be at high risk for cancer

Relevance: Medium

pointerRelevance

Strength of Science: Medium-Low

pointerStrength of Science

Study : Angelina Jolie spoke out on BRCA testing: Did genetic testing increase?

Most relevant for: People interested in genetic testing for an inherited mutation

Angelina Jolie published an editorial in the New York Times in 2013 about her choice to have a double mastectomy after finding out she was positive for a BRCA1 mutation. Researchers from a recent study claim that her celebrity endorsement of BRCA testing may have missed its target audience (previvors), due to the increase in BRCA testing following publication of the editorial but a decrease in the number of mastectomies performed. However, the study failed to take into account that many women without breast cancer do not pursue mastectomy in the months following genetic testing. (1/4/17)

Read More
Angelina Jolie spoke out on BRCA testing: Did genetic testing increase?