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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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1 through 10 of 89

Relevance: Medium-High

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Quality of Writing: High

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Article : Transgender peoples' perspectives of being diagnosed with gender-associated cancer

Most relevant for: transgender people

An ABC News article provides viewpoints and data that conveys the added stress experienced by transgender and gender-nonconforming people when they are diagnosed with gender-associated cancer (e.g., ovarian or prostate cancer) that does not match their gender identity. (posted 9/13/21)

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Transgender peoples' perspectives of being diagnosed with gender-associated cancer

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Cancer risks of people with inherited PALB2 mutations

Most relevant for: people with inherited PALB2 mutations

In the largest study of people with inherited PALB2 mutations to date, the gene was linked to increased lifetime risk of breast cancer in women and men, ovarian and pancreatic cancer but not prostate or colorectal cancer. (posted 7/1/21)

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Cancer risks of people with inherited PALB2 mutations

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Birth control pills may offer long-term protection against endometrial and ovarian cancer

Most relevant for: People concerned about endometrial, ovarian or breast cancer risk

A large study showed that birth control pills may protect against endometrial and ovarian cancers, even years after use was discontinued. (posted 6/1/21)

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Birth control pills may offer long-term protection against endometrial and ovarian cancer

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Body Mass Index (BMI) may affect how well aspirin use protects against colorectal and ovarian cancer

Most relevant for: People concerned about their risk of colorectal or ovarian cancer.

This study looked at the impact of daily aspirin use on the risk for many types of cancers and whether this effect can be modified by risk factors such as obesity, smoking, physical inactivity or a family history of cancer. Daily aspirin use: 

  • lowered the risk for colorectal cancer, but this effect was lost as Body Mass Index (BMI) increased.
  • lowered the risk of ovarian cancer risk among obese women.
  • offered little or no protection against breast, endometrial or advanced prostate cancer.

(3/19/21)

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Body Mass Index (BMI) may affect how well aspirin use protects against colorectal and ovarian cancer

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Breastfeeding may lower risk of ovarian cancer in women with BRCA mutations

Most relevant for: Women considering breastfeeding who have inherited BRCA mutations.

Data from a large-scale study suggests that breastfeeding may protect against ovarian cancer in women with inherited mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. (1/28/21)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Breastfeeding may lower risk of ovarian cancer in women with BRCA mutations

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : Knowing about an inherited BRCA mutation improves outcomes for women with breast cancer

Most relevant for: Young women with, or at high risk for an inherited BRCA mutation

Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are linked to a high lifetime risk of breast and other cancers. This study shows that women who know that they have a BRCA mutation before they are diagnosed with breast cancer have improved outcomes including diagnosis at earlier stages and improved overall survival. (10/26/20)

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Knowing about an inherited BRCA mutation improves outcomes for women with breast cancer

Relevance: Medium-Low

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Strength of Science: Medium-Low

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Dairy milk may slightly raise breast cancer risk

Most relevant for: Women who consume dairy or soy

Debate continues about whether consuming soy or dairy products increases breast cancer risk. This study looked at a large number of women and found no link between soy and breast cancer risk. The study did find that postmenopausal women who drank dairy milk have a small increase in breast cancer risk. (09/04/20)

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Dairy milk may slightly raise breast cancer risk

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: High

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Quality of Writing: High

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Study : Among women with breast cancer, who should have genetic testing for an inherited mutation?

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who do not know if they have an inherited mutation in a gene linked to breast cancer

Which breast cancer patients should consider genetic testing? Knowing whether you have an inherited mutation may inform the decisions you and your healthcare provider make about treatment. But it can also increase stress and anxiety. This XRAY reviews a study of how different guidelines affect genetic testing recommendations for people with breast cancer. (8/27/20)

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Among women with breast cancer, who should have genetic testing for an inherited mutation?

Relevance: Medium-High

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Strength of Science: Medium

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Research Timeline: Human Research

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Study : Insulin resistance linked to differences in breast cancer survival between Black and White women

Most relevant for: Black women

Black women are more likely to die from breast cancer compared to White women. More Black women have a condition called insulin resistance than White women.  This study found that insulin resistance might be one of the reasons that Black women are more likely than White women to die from breast cancer. Additional research is needed to see if lowering insulin levels will improve breast cancer survival in Black women. (07/30/20)

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Insulin resistance linked to differences in breast cancer survival between Black and White women

Relevance: High

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Strength of Science: Medium-High

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Research Timeline: Post Approval

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Study : What is the risk for contralateral breast cancer in women with an inherited BRCA1, BRCA2 or TP53 mutation?

Most relevant for: Women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40

For women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, knowing their risk of breast cancer in the other (contralateral) breast can help them make decisions about surgery and surveillance. Research has shown that women with an inherited mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 have an increased risk for contralateral breast cancer. A British study shows that women with an inherited mutation in the TP53 gene may have an increased risk for contralateral breast cancer, which is even higher greater than the risk of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. (6/6/20)

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What is the risk for contralateral breast cancer in women with an inherited BRCA1, BRCA2 or TP53 mutation?