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FORCE's eXamining the Relevance of Articles for You (XRAY) program looks behind the headlines of cancer news to help you understand what the research means for you. XRAY is a reliable source of hereditary cancer research-related news and information.
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11 through 20 of 28

Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-Low

Study : Do hair dyes or straighteners increase breast cancer risk?

Most relevant for: Young women who use hair dye or straighteners

Many women use products to color or straighten their hair. A large U.S. study linked the use of permanent hair dye and straighteners to increased breast cancer risk, particularly among black women. This XRAY reviews the limitations of this study and highlights the need for additional research before accepting these conclusions. (1/29/20)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Quality of Writing: Medium-High

Personal Story : A young woman's story of genetic testing and risk-reducing mastectomy

Most relevant for: Young women of color with a BRCA mutation

Alejandra Campoverdi comes from a family with three generations of breast cancer. As a former White House aide and active educator in the Latina community, she has openly shared her story of genetic testing, her BRCA2 mutation and her plans for risk-reducing mastectomy at age 39. (6/6/19)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Gaps in information about breast cancer risk and prevention impact African American women

Most relevant for: African American women who are at high risk for breast cancer

A study showed that African American women with increased breast cancer risk experienced greater burdens in obtaining information at each step compared to white women. Racial differences in preventive choices correlated with differences in information and provider access. (3/14/19)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Prevalence of BRCA founder mutations in Bahamian women

Most relevant for: Bahamanian women

The Bahamas has the highest known frequency of BRCA mutations among people diagnosed with breast cancer. This study reviewed whether population-based BRCA testing (testing everyone regardless of family or personal history of cancer) would be an effective approach for finding mutation carriers in the Bahamas. (3/4/19)

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Relevance: Medium-High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Inherited breast cancer in Nigerian women

Most relevant for: Nigerian women or women of Nigerian descent who have breast cancer

A new study shows that among Nigerian women, one in eight cases of breast cancer is due to an inherited mutation in BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 or TP53. (12/5/18)

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Relevance: High

Quality of Writing: High

Article : The importance of racial diversity in clinical trials

Most relevant for: People who are a member of a racial or ethnic minority group

This article by journalists Caroline Chen and Riley Wong looks at racial disparities between participation in clinical trials and the population of people with cancer. (11/6/18)

Este artículo está disponible en español.

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: Medium-High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Surgeon attitude impacts rate of genetic testing after a breast cancer diagnosis

Most relevant for: Young women diagnosed with breast cancer who have not yet had genetic testing

A study in JAMA Surgery this year examined the factors that impact genetic testing after a breast cancer diagnosis. This study suggests that the attitudes of attending surgeons about genetic testing have the most impact on whether patients receive testing. (10/6/18)

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Relevance: High

Strength of Science: High

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Study : Disparities in research impact breast screening guidelines

Most relevant for: Women at average risk for breast cancer

For women at average risk of breast cancer, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) currently recommends beginning annual breast cancer screening at age 50. However, because these guidelines are largely based on data from white women, they may not be sensitive to racial differences.  A new study assesses the age distribution of breast cancer cases across race/ethnicity in the U.S. (6/21/18)

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Relevance: High

Quality of Writing: High

Article : The right not to know when not knowing is dangerous

Most relevant for: People with Icelandic heritage

Healthcare providers are bound by the guiding principle of doing no harm. But how does this concept apply to their patients who have not consented to genetic testing or who do not want to know their results? In that case, is providing test results more harmful or not? Anna Clausen explores these issues in the context of breast cancer gene testing in her Global Health Now article “The Right Not to Know: When Ignorance is Bliss but Deadly.” (4/20/18)

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Relevance: Medium

Research Timeline: Post Approval

Update : FDA approves at-home test kits for inherited cancer: how useful are they?

Most relevant for: People who are considering or have had direct-to-consumer testing through 23andMe

Genetic testing for health conditions (such as risk for cancer) typically requires a prescription from a doctor. Until recently, direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing has focused on tests to learn your ancestry and find of unknown branches of family trees. A laboratory called 23andMe that provides direct-to-consumer genetic testing has been given FDA approval to report results for 3 mutations found in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The FDA statement provides details about this approval and warns people about the limitations of the 23andMe test. (03/19/18)

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