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Preventive Guidelines Discriminate Against Cancer Survivors

December 8, 2013

FORCE has created a change.org petition to ask the United States Preventive Services Task Force to change their guidelines to include cancer survivors. You can read more about the issue and the petition below.

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The United States Preventive Services Task Force (US

The panel wields considerable power over consumer access to preventive health care services—primary care clinicians and health systems follow its guidelines. And importantly, the guidelines are incorporated into the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which states that health plans must provide benefits without imposing cost-sharing (i.e., without a deductible or co-pay) for services that have a rating from the task force of “A” or “B.”PSTF) is a government-supported independent panel of experts that reviews and develops recommendations on select preventive health services. In the panel’s own words: “The USPSTF is committed to improving the health of all Americans. To achieve this, the USPSTF assesses evidence on specific populations and makes specific evidence-based recommendations for specific populations.

The USPSTF has reviewed several, but not all preventive services available to keep us healthy, so some gaps are unavoidable. (Read a list of USPSTF-reviewed services here.)

The panel does have guidelines for risk assessment and BRCA testing, which are now being updated. Revisions have been improved based on feedback and suggestions from many groups and health care professionals; the proposed update supports genetic counseling and testing with a “Grade B” in women who have a family history consistent with a mutation, requiring insurance companies to cover these preventive services without a co-pay or deductible. But as we have previously reported, serious gaps remain, including omission of:

  • men
  • risk assessment and Lynch Syndrome testing
  • letter grade assignment for screening and prevention for high-risk women

We will continue to post about these gaps in policy that affect our community’s access to care. This blog post highlights one particular aspect of the USPSTF draft guidelines on risk assessment and BRCA testing: the discrimination against cancer survivors.

Regarding its draft guidelines, the USPSTF states: “These recommendations apply to women who have not received a diagnosis of breast or ovarian cancer but who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer whose BRCA status is unknown. Women presenting to their primary care providers who have a relative with a known potentially harmful mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes should receive genetic counseling and consideration for testing.

FORCE response to the USPSTF draft guidelines

In October of this year FORCE sent a letter to the USPSTF which included four key points about this gap:

  • We pointed out that cancer survivors with a BRCA mutation are at high risk for an unrelated second primary cancer, and could benefit from preventive aspects of BRCA testing.
  • We requested that the task force review the strong research evidence supporting genetic risk assessment for preventive purposes in women who have been already been diagnosed with breast cancer and meet national guidelines.
  • We emphasized how omission of survivors from these guidelines will negatively impact their access to care and coverage for preventive services under the PPACA.
  • We requested that women with a cancer diagnosis be included in the definition of “population under consideration.”

USPSTF response to FORCE

The USPSTF responded to our letter with this statement, “Although the Task Force recognizes the importance of the further evaluation women who have the diagnosis of breast or ovarian cancer, that assessment is part of disease management and is beyond the scope of this recommendation. The Task Force recognizes that genetic counseling and testing may be an important part of disease management for women who have been diagnosed. However, the Task Force’s mission is to determine the evidence-base for preventive services in the general population who have no signs or symptoms of disease.

I recognize that the USPSTF is focused on prevention only, and that any service that may come under the category of treatment is beyond their scope. And it is true that under some circumstances—particularly in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer—BRCA testing can affect treatment decisions, including the decision to have lumpectomy or unilateral mastectomy vs. bilateral mastectomy. However, the USPSTF response is missing a critical point: BRCA testing has preventive value beyond “disease management” and can help survivors prevent a new, completely unrelated second diagnosis of breast cancer. Experts still recommend genetic risk assessment for women whose personal and/or family medical history indicates a possible mutation even after they have completed their treatment for cancer and have no evidence of disease. These women meet the task force’s criteria of having no signs or symptoms of disease.

The USPSTF guidelines discriminate against cancer survivors

The USPSTF’s insistence to exclude survivors from these guidelines, despite research evidence to show the preventive value in testing people after cancer, amounts to discrimination against cancer survivors. The panel implies that once a person is diagnosed with cancer, all further health efforts fall under the category of treatment of the disease. By dismissing the preventive value of BRCA testing in this population they also dismiss the value of preventive services in cancer survivors in general, many of whom will go on to live long healthy lives if they are given access to appropriate preventive services.

My personal history is a perfect illustration. When I was first diagnosed with breast cancer, my health care providers failed to recognize that I had several red flags for a mutation. It wasn’t until after my unilateral mastectomy—when I read an article about BRCA testing—that I recognized I fit the guidelines for BRCA testing. I learned after my treatment that I had a BRCA 2 mutation; I was fortunate because a prophylactic mastectomy of my so-called healthy breast found early-stage cancer. During my BSO, abnormal cells were found in my abdominal wash, indicating that dangerous changes that could develop into cancer if left unaddressed were already underway. These surgeries were preventive in every sense of the word. The fact that I had already been diagnosed with breast cancer did not take away from the preventive benefit of BRCA testing for me. Now 15 years out from my preventive surgeries, I remain healthy and cancer-free. I am confident that the preventive steps I took have kept me from developing a second primary cancer.

Thousands of women like me who have completed treatment for cancer meet expert guidelines for risk assessment and BRCA testing, and also fit the USPSTF’s criteria of having “no signs or symptoms of disease.” Research evidence shows that genetic risk assessment and preventive action can lower their risk for a new primary cancer, detect it early, and lower their mortality. In many cases these women are the key to identifying a family mutation. As U.S. citizens, they are entitled to similar preventive services as people in the general population. Continued exclusion of this population discriminates against breast and ovarian cancer survivors and jeopardizes not just them, but also their healthy relatives.

The guidelines run counter to the spirit of the PPACA

As of January 2014—due to provisions in the PPACA – U.S. citizens with a pre-existing condition can no longer be denied or dropped from their health insurance plans. The stated goals of the PPACA are: “The most prevalent goal, however, and the one concept that is nearly universally accepted is the desire to improve the quality of care across the United States (U.S.) for all citizens until it meets the highest of standards.” It is ironic that at a time when the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is being implemented to eliminate pre-existing condition exclusions by insurance companies, the USPSTF task force is in effect adding back pre-existing status, and therefore barriers to cancer survivors’ access to preventive care.

What you can do

After several letters to the USPSTF, we have decided to appeal to the task force once more, focusing on the issues with the most supportive research evidence. We ask that you read and sign on to our counter-response letter, which we plan to submit by December 12. (Read more about the issues here). We ask you to share this letter with any cancer survivors, previvors, health care providers, caregivers, and everyone you know and ask them to sign on to the letter as well. This issue and the USPSTF actions to assure access to preventive services for all citizens effects us all. We will request a written response from the USPSTF and will share it with our community. We will continue to post about the gaps in policy that affect our community’s access to care.

To sign on to the letter, send an email to suefriedman@facingourrisk.org and include your full name, city, and state.

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5 Comments

  1. calliecandle says:

    Reblogged this on the risky body and commented:
    More fom FORCE regarding guidelines for preventative BRCA+ care.

  2. Reblogged this on Blogging BRCA and commented:
    Important words from Sue Friedman, our fearless FORCE leader:

  3. […] out systemic issues needing improvement. I have blogged about these topics in the past, including recommendations to expand the United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines on genetic tes… to include cancer survivors; men, Lynch and other cancer syndromes, and risk-management options […]

  4. […] who have never been diagnosed with cancer. When the USPSTF revealed their draft of the guidelines, we voiced our concern that they left many gaps in access to care. FORCE took action by posting a change.org petition pointing out that the guidelines were unfair to […]

  5. […] who have never been diagnosed with cancer. When the USPSTF revealed their draft of the guidelines, we voiced our concern that they left many gaps in access to care. FORCE took action by posting a change.org petition which over 3000 people in our community […]

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