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FDA Approval of Promising Targeted Therapy Likely Stalled Until More Research Studies are Completed

June 29, 2014

Wednesday, June 25, 2014 was a pivotal day for our community.

It began with promise and ended with disappointment. For the first time ever, a treatment targeted for BRCA-associated cancers was considered for approval by the FDA. Yesterday the FDA’s Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee (ODAC) held a hearing to consider FDA approval of the drug olaparib for BRCA-positive ovarian cancer.

FORCE has been following the development of these drugs for the last decade.

Since then, we have followed the research, educated people about these agents, generated excitement about the research focus on HBOC, and facilitated clinical trial enrollment. For the HBOC community and the almost 1 million people in the US that FORCE represents, these targeted therapies offered hope. Still, completion of PARP inhibitor studies has taken a long time and in the duration, many people who could not access PARP inhibitors and did not meet criteria for any clinical trial have died of hereditary cancers.

FORCE testified at the hearing on behalf of the HBOC community.

Lisa Schlager VP of Policy at FORCE testifies.

Lisa Schlager VP of Policy at FORCE testifies.

FORCE was there to represent our community at this important hearing, as we have always been in the past. When the community needed protection against genetic discrimination, FORCE successfully lobbied for the passage of GINA laws. When laboratories began aggressive direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic testing, FORCE was there testifying to the Secretary of Health against these practices. We were at the steps of the US Supreme Court fighting for freedom from gene patents, and Wednesday we stood up in front of the ODAC hearing and urged the FDA to approve olaparib to treat hereditary ovarian cancer. You can read our full testimony here.


During the hearing, ODAC voted against olaparib approval in favor of waiting for further research results.

The FDA and ODAC recommended waiting until the completion of further studies before approving the drug, a process which could take several more years. The FDA will issue a final ruling on this application in October, however it is expected that they will not reverse their position on waiting until further studies are completed before approving this drug.

A point of contention is the issue of progression-free survival vs. overall survival.

The concept of progression-free survival (PFS) refers to the period of time that a treatment causes the cancer to improve or remain stable without getting worse. Overall survival (OS) measures the specific length of time that a person with cancer survives after receiving treatment. Scientist use these terms to measure the success or efficacy of new cancer therapies. Traditionally, the FDA has used only overall survival when considering the approval of a new drug. Other outcomes such as improved quality of life, and progression free survival are not usually considered significant enough for the FDA to approve a drug. There has debate among researchers and advocacy groups about whether or not a drug should be approved if it doesn’t demonstrate OS benefits. For patients facing advanced disease, PFS may seem like an acceptable endpoint.

In the olaparib study there was a statistically significant benefit in progression-free survival for BRCA mutation carriers who received olaparib: 6.9 months longer than those on placebo. The time until next treatment was 9.4 months longer in BRCA mutation carriers who took olaparib compared to those who received a placebo. Olaparib showed a significant effect on time to subsequent therapy in BRCA-mutation carriers, with the median time to subsequent therapy of 15.6 months in patients receiving olaparib versus 6.2 months in the placebo group.  There was a trend towards improved overall survival for women who took olaparib, with 55% of patients in the placebo arm dying compared to 50%, with a reported hazard ratio of 0.73 but this did not reach statistical significance in part because of the small number of patients in the study.

FORCE believes olaparib should receive FDA approval now. 

FORCE strongly supports the immediate approval of olaparib as a maintenance drug for BRCA-positive ovarian cancer because we believe it will improve the lives of women fighting ovarian cancer today. We will continue to do everything in our power to urge the FDA to consider the needs of our community.

In the meantime, we will continue to encourage our community to participate in and match patients to the critical research that we hope will lead to FDA approval of PARP inhibitors.

However, given the small subpopulations of women eligible for these trials, and the long timeline for completion of these studies, we are very concerned that completion of larger trials could take too long. Looking at the data on progression-free survival and time to subsequent first therapy, olaparib gives BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer more time without disease and more time where they can avoid chemotherapy, translating to months or years with improved quality of life.

FORCE urged the FDA to consider the unmet needs of the HBOC community. In our testimony we asked the FDA,

“How many more women will die or suffer the effects of advanced disease and chemotherapy while we are waiting for larger trials to be completed? Women fighting hereditary ovarian cancer do not have time to wait.”

Research requires people! FORCE connects people to HBOC research.

With the FDA leaning towards delaying approval until the completion of further studies, now more than ever our efforts to enroll patients into HBOC studies is critical! Please help us create a better future for people affected by hereditary cancers by:

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